NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Why Doesn't Asia Have Bigger Bond Markets?

Barry Eichengreen, Pipat Luengnaruemitchai

NBER Working Paper No. 10576
Issued in June 2004
NBER Program(s):   CF   IFM

Asia's underdeveloped bond markets and dependence on bank finance have been topics of concern since the crisis of 1997-8. In this paper we document that the slow development of Asian bond markets is a phenomenon with multiple dimensions. Larger country size, stronger institutions, less volatile exchange rates, and more competitive banking sectors tend to be positively associated with bond market capitalization. Asian countries' strong fiscal balances, while admirable on other grounds, have not been conducive to the growth of government bond markets. The results suggest that the region's structural characteristics and macroeconomic and financial policies account fully for differences in bond market development between Asia and the rest of the world. Once one controls for these characteristics and policies, in other words, there is no residual Asia effect.'

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w10576

Published: Barry Eichengreen & Pipat Luengnaruemitchai, 2006. "Why doesn’t Asia have bigger bond markets?," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Asian bond markets: issues and prospects, volume 30, pages 40-77 Bank for International Settlements.

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