NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Where Do New US-Trained Science-Engineering PhDs come from?

Richard B. Freeman, Emily Jin, Chia-Yu Shen

NBER Working Paper No. 10554
Issued in June 2004
NBER Program(s):   ED   LS

This study shows that the demographic and institutional origins of new US trained science and engineering PhDs changed markedly between the late 1960s-1970s to the 1990s-early 2000s. In 1966, 71% of science and engineering PhD graduates were US-born males, 6% were US-born females, and 23% were foreign born. In 2000, 36% of the graduates were US-born males, 25% were US-born females, and 39% were foreign born. Between 1970 and 2000 most of the growth in PhDs was in less prestigious smaller doctorate programs. The undergraduate origins of bachelor's obtaining science and engineering PhDs changed only modestly among US colleges and universities while there was a huge growth in the number of foreign bachelor's graduates obtaining US PhDs.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w10554

Published: Ehrenberg, Ronald G. and Paula E. Stephan (eds.) Science and the University. Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin Press, 2007.

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