NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Household vs. Personal Accounts of the U.S. Labor Market, 1965-2000

Casey B. Mulligan, Yona Rubinstein

NBER Working Paper No. 10320
Issued in February 2004
NBER Program(s):LS, PE

The empirical labor supply literature includes some simple aggregate studies, and some individual-level studies explicitly accounting for heterogeneity and the discrete choice, but sometimes leaving open the ultimately aggregate questions that motivated the study. As a middle ground, we construct household-based measures of labor supply by within-household aggregating answers to the usual weeks and hours worked questionnaire items. Household (H) measures are substantially different than the more familiar person (P) measures: H employment rates are relatively higher, with little trend, and relatively little fluctuations. From the H point of view, essentially all aggregate hours trends and fluctuations can be attributed to changes on the intensive' margin and not the extensive' margin a characterization that is opposite of that derived from P measures. The cross-H distribution of hours is richer, and less spiked, than the cross-P distribution. Labor supply is more wage elastic from an H point of view.

download in pdf format
   (929 K)

email paper

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w10320

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded* these:
Mulligan and Rubinstein w10892 The Closing of the Gender Gap as a Roy Model Illusion
Card, Mas, Moretti, and Saez w16396 Inequality at Work: The Effect of Peer Salaries on Job Satisfaction
Ohanian w15258 What - or Who - Started the Great Depression?
Deaton w17128 The Financial Crisis and the Well-Being of Americans
Flood, Hodrick, and Kaplan w1971 An Evaluation of Recent Evidence on Stock Market Bubbles
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us