NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

What do Aggregate Consumption Euler Equations Say about the Capital Income Tax Burden?

Casey B. Mulligan

NBER Working Paper No. 10262
Issued in February 2004
NBER Program(s):   EFG   PE

Aggregate consumption Euler equations fit financial asset return data poorly. But they fit the return on the capital stock well, which leads us to three empirical findings relating to the capital income tax burden. First, capital taxation drives a wedge between consumption growth and the expected pre-tax capital return. Second, capital taxation is the major distortion in the capital market, in the sense that most of the medium and long run deviations between expected consumption growth and the expected pre-tax capital return are associated with capital taxation. Third, consumption growth appears to be pretty elastic to the after-tax capital return (i.e., capital is elastically supplied), even while it appears inelastic to returns on various financial assets. Capital income taxes are passed on through reduced capital accumulation, or higher markups, or some combination.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w10262

Published: Mulligan, Casey B. "What Do Aggregate Consumption Euler Equations Say About The Capital-Income Tax Burden?," American Economic Review, 2004, v94(2,May), 166-170. citation courtesy of

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