NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Personal Taxation, Portfolio Choice and The Effect of the Corporation Income Tax

Martin Feldstein, Joel Slemrod

NBER Working Paper No. 241 (Also Reprint No. r0106)
Issued in November 1980
NBER Program(s):   PE

Extending the traditional treatment of the corporate tax to an economy with a progressive personal tax fundamentally changes the analysis. While the corporate tax system (CTS) does increase the total tax rate on corporate source income for some investors, the exclusion of retained earnings implies that the CTS lowers the tax rate for high-income investors. Analyzing such an economy requires replacing the traditional "equal-yield" equilibrium condition with a more general portfolio balance model. In this model, introducing a CTS can actually increase the corporate share of the capital stock even though the relative tax rate on corporate income rises.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w0241

Published: Feldstein, Martin S. and Slemrod, Joel. "Personal Taxation, Portfolio Choice, and the Effect of the Corporation Income Tax." Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 88, No. 5, (Oct. 1980), pp. 854-866.

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