NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Economics of Migration: An Empirical Analysis with Special Referenceto the Role of Job Mobility

Ann P. Bartel

NBER Working Paper No. 198 (Also Reprint No. r0051)
Issued in April 1980
NBER Program(s):   LS

This article continues the work on the analysis of the individual's decision to migrate, but differs from the previous studies by focusing on the relationship between job mobility and migration. First, the proportion of geographic mobility that occurs in conjunction with a job change is calculated. Second, it is shown that the true effects of human capital variables, job characteristics, and family variables on the decision to migrate are best measured when one takes account of the relationship between migration and job mobility. Third, the effect of migration on the wage gains of individuals is studied and again the need for distinguishing among moves that were associated with quits, layoffs, and transfers is clearly shown. Finally, by using three data sets that encompass different age groups (the National Longitudinal Surveys [NLS] of Young and Mature Men and the Coleman-Rossi Retrospective Life History Study), the importance of the relationship between migration and job mobility is demonstrated at different points in the life cycle.

download in pdf format
   (214 K)

email paper

This paper is available as PDF (214 K) or via email.

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/w0198

Published: Bartel, Ann P. "The Migration Decision: What Role Does Job Mobility Play?" The American Economic Review, Vol. 69, No. 5, (December 1979), pp. 775-786 .

Users who downloaded this paper also downloaded these:
Mincer and Jovanovic Labor Mobility and Wages
Hanson w14490 The Economic Consequences of the International Migration of Labor
Mincer w0199 Family Migration Decisions
Todaro Internal Migration in Developing Countries: A Survey
Cox and Ureta w9766 International Migration, Remittances, and Schooling: Evidence from El Salvador
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us