NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Intra-Ethnic Diversity in Hispanic Child Mortality, 1890-1910

Myron P. Gutmann, Michael R. Haines, W. Parker Frisbie, K. Stephen Blanchard

NBER Historical Working Paper No. 111
Issued in December 1998
NBER Program(s):   DAE

The recent demography of the Hispanic population of the United States has received considerable attention, but historical perspective is more elusive partly due to data limitations. A nationally representative sample of the Hispanic population of the United States, based on the manuscripts of the 1910 census, now exists that includes 71,500 Hispanic-origin persons plus another 24,000 of their non-Hispanic neighbors. We estimate childhood mortality for 1890 to 1910, using indirect demographic methods of estimation and find infant and child mortality in the Hispanic population that was higher than for the non-Hispanic whites but slightly lower than for nonwhite, non-Hispanics (mostly African Americans). Hispanic rural, farm populations in California, Texas, and Arizona did the best, though still experiencing high mortality. The usual advantage of rural residence at the turn of the century holds outside of New Mexico and Florida.

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Document Object Identifier (DOI): 10.3386/h0111

Published: Demography, Volume 37, Number 4, November 2000, pp. 467-475

 
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