NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Bretton Woods and the Great Inflation

Michael Bordo, Barry Eichengreen

Chapter in NBER book The Great Inflation: The Rebirth of Modern Central Banking (2013), Michael D. Bordo and Athanasios Orphanides, editors (p. 449 - 489)
Conference held September 25-27, 2008
Published in June 2013 by University of Chicago Press
© 2013 by the National Bureau of Economic Research

This chapter argues that international considerations had an important influence on Federal Reserve policymaking in the early 1960s, and that adherence to the Bretton Woods peg of the price of gold at $35 per ounce served as an anchor for a low inflation policy. It begins with an overview of Fed policy and its motivations in the 1960s based on the Board of Governor’s Annual Reports. The chapter then uses narrative evidence from the minutes of the Federal Open Market Committee to develop the view that balance-of-payments considerations exercised a restraining influence on inflation before 1965.

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This paper was revised on October 19, 2009

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

This chapter first appeared as NBER working paper w14532, Bretton Woods and the Great Inflation, Michael D. Bordo, Barry Eichengreen
Commentary on this chapter:
  Discussion, Michael D. Bordo, Athanasios Orphanides
  Comment, Allan H. Meltzer
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