NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

High-Skilled Immigration, STEM Employment, and Nonroutine-Biased Technical Change

Nir Jaimovich, Henry E. Siu

Chapter in NBER book High-Skilled Migration to the United States and its Economic Consequences (2018), Gordon H. Hanson, William R. Kerr, and Sarah Turner, editors (p. 177 - 204)
Conference held July 10-11, 2016
Published in May 2018 by University of Chicago Press
© 2018 by the National Bureau of Economic Research

We study the role of foreign-born workers in the growth of employment in STEM occupations since 1980. Given the importance of employment in these fields for research and innovation, we consider their role in a model featuring endogenous non-routine-biased technical change. We use this model to quantify the impact of high-skilled immigration, and the increasing tendency of such immigrants to work in innovation, on the pace of non-routine-biased technical change, the polarization of employment opportunities, and the evolution of wage inequality since 1980.

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This chapter first appeared as NBER working paper w23185, High-Skilled Immigration, STEM Employment, and Non-Routine-Biased Technical Change, Nir Jaimovich, Henry E. Siu
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