NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

High-Skilled Immigration, STEM Employment, and Non-Routine-Biased Technical Change

Nir Jaimovich, Henry E. Siu


This chapter is a preliminary draft unless otherwise noted. It may not have been subjected to the formal review process of the NBER. This page will be updated as the chapter is revised.

Chapter in forthcoming NBER book High-Skilled Migration to the United States and its Economic Consequences, Gordon H. Hanson, William R. Kerr, and Sarah Turner, editors
Conference held July 10-11, 2016
Forthcoming from University of Chicago Press

We study the role of foreign-born workers in the growth of employment in STEM occupations since 1980. Given the importance of employment in these fields for research and innovation, we consider their role in a model featuring endogenous non-routine-biased technical change. We use this model to quantify the impact of high-skilled immigration, and the increasing tendency of such immigrants to work in innovation, on the pace of non-routine-biased technical change, the polarization of employment opportunities, and the evolution of wage inequality since 1980.

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This chapter first appeared as NBER working paper w23185, High-Skilled Immigration, STEM Employment, and Non-Routine-Biased Technical Change, Nir Jaimovich, Henry E. Siu
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