NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

The Return to Work and Women's Employment Decisions

Nicole Maestas

Chapter in NBER book Women Working Longer: Increased Employment at Older Ages (2018), Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz, editors (p. 55 - 83)
Conference held May 21-22, 2016
Published in April 2018 by University of Chicago Press
© 2018 by the National Bureau of Economic Research

It is well documented that individuals in couples tend to retire around the same time. But because women tend to marry older men, this means many married women retire at younger ages than their husbands. This fact is somewhat at odds with lifecycle theory that suggests women might otherwise retire at later ages than men because they have longer life expectancies, and often have had shorter careers on account of childrearing. As a result, the opportunity cost of retirement—in terms of foregone potential earnings and accruals to Social Security wealth—may be larger for married women than for their husbands. Using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), I find evidence that the returns to additional work beyond mid-life are greater for married women than for married men. The potential gain in Social Security wealth alone is enough to place married women on nearly equal footing with married men in terms of Social Security wealth at age 70.

This chapter is no longer available for free download, since the book has been published. To obtain a copy, you must buy the book.
Order from Amazon.com

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

Users who downloaded this chapter also downloaded* these:
Goldin and Katz Introduction to "Women Working Longer: Increased Employment at Older Ages"
Gelber, Isen, and Song The Role of Social Security Benefits in the Initial Increase of Older Women’s Employment: Evidence from the Social Security Notch
Lusardi and Mitchell Older Women's Labor Market Attachment, Retirement Planning, and Household Debt
Goldin and Katz Women Working Longer: Facts and Some Explanations
Fahle and McGarry Women Working Longer: Labor Market Implications of Providing Family Care
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us