NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Regulating Systemic Risk through Transparency: Trade-Offs in Making Data Public

Augustin Landier, David Thesmar

Chapter in NBER book Risk Topography: Systemic Risk and Macro Modeling (2014), Markus K. Brunnermeier and Arvind Krishnamurthy, editors (p. 31 - 44)
Conference held April 28, 2011
Published in August 2014 by University of Chicago Press
© 2014 by the National Bureau of Economic Research

Public or partial disclosure of financial data is a key element in the design of a new regulatory environment. We study the costs and benefits of higher public access to financial data and analyze qualitatively how frequency, disclosure lag and granularity of such open data can be chosen to maximize welfare, depending on the relative magnitude of economic frictions. We lay out a simple framework to choose optimal transparency of financial data and, in doing so, address the following questions: At what frequency should data be collected and made available? How long should the regulator wait before releasing data? And, at what level of detail should information be released?

This chapter is no longer available for free download, since the book has been published. To obtain a copy, you must buy the book.
Order from Amazon.com

Machine-readable bibliographic record - MARC, RIS, BibTeX

This chapter first appeared as NBER working paper w17664, Regulating Systemic Risk through Transparency: Tradeoffs in Making Data Public, Augustin Landier, David Thesmar
Users who downloaded this chapter also downloaded these:
Sufi Detecting "Bad" Leverage
Bassett, Gilchrist, Weinbach, and Zakrašjek Improving Our Ability to Monitor Bank Lending
Duffie Systemic Risk Exposures: A 10-by-10-by-10 Approach
Acharya A Transparency Standard for Derivatives
Brunnermeier and Krishnamurthy Introduction to "Risk Topography: Systemic Risk and Macro Modeling"
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us