NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

2017, No. 2

NBER Affiliates' Work in Medical Journals

Note to Readers

Many NBER-affiliated researchers publish some of their findings in medical journals that preclude pre-publication distribution. This makes it impossible to include these papers in the NBER working paper series. This is a partial listing of recent papers in this category.

Spending on Care after Surgery Driven by Choice of Care Settings Instead of Intensity of Services
L. M. Chen, E. C. Norton, M. Banerjee, S. E. Regenbogen, A. H. Cain-Nielsen, and J. D. Birkmeyer, Health Affairs, 36(1), January 2017, pp. 83-90.
  The rising popularity of episode-based payment for surgery underscores the need to better understand the determinants of spending on postacute care, which is often used after surgery. In an examination of postacute care spending for fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries after three common procedures, the researchers find significant variation in spending between hospitals. They show that the variation in spending is more strongly related to the postacute care setting, such as a skilled nursing facility or home health care, than it is to the intensity of care.

The Volume of TV Advertisements during the ACA's First Enrollment Period Was Associated with Increased Insurance Coverage
P. Karaca-Mandic, A. Wilcock, L. Baum, C. L. Barry, E. Franklin Fowler, J. Niederdeppe, and S. E. Gollust, Health Affairs, 36(4), March 2017, pp. 747-54.
The launch of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was accompanied by major insurance information campaigns by the government, private insurers, and others. The researchers study the impact of these campaigns and find that counties with higher levels of television advertisements experienced larger declines in the share of the population without insurance. State-sponsored commercials were particularly effective, driving increases in Medicaid enrollment.

Health and Access to Care during the First 2 Years of the ACA Medicaid Expansions
S. Miller and L. R. Wherry, New England Journal of Medicine, 376, March 2017, pp. 947-56.
This study examines changes in coverage, utilization, and health outcomes for low-income adults in the two years after many states expanded Medicaid through the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The researchers find a reduction in uninsurance rates and in reports of financial strain or difficulty affording medical care for adults in the expansion states after implementation. However, they also find an increase in reports of longer wait times and difficulty securing appointments.

Deaths Attributable to Diabetes in the United States: Comparison of Data Sources and Estimation Approaches
A. Stokes and S. H. Preston, PLOS ONE, 12(1), January 2017.

Adjusting Risk Adjustment — Accounting for Variation in Diagnostic Intensity
A. Finkelstein, M. Gentzkow, P. Hull, and H. Williams, New England Journal of Medicine, 376, February 2017, pp. 608-10.

Antitrust and Accountable Care Organizations: Observations for the Physician Market
S. A. Kleiner, D. Ludwinski, and W. D. White, Medical Care Research and Review, 74(1), February 2017, pp. 97-108.

Screening Mammography for Free: Impact of Eliminating Cost Sharing on Cancer Screening Rates
A. B. Jena, J. Huang, B. Fireman, V. Fung, S. Gazelle, M. B. Landrum, M. Chernew, J. P. Newhouse, and J. Hsu, Health Services Research, 52(1), February 2017, pp. 191-206.

Housing Instability and Children's Health Insurance Gaps
A. Carroll, H. Corman, M. A. Curtis, K. Noonan, and N. E. Reichman, Academic Pediatrics, February 2017 (published online).

Nudging Leads Consumers in Colorado to Shop but Not Switch ACA Marketplace Plans
K. M. Marzilli Ericson, J. Kingsdale, T. Layton, and A. Sacarny, Health Affairs, 36(2), February 2017, pp. 311-9.

Variation in Physician Spending and Association with Patient Outcomes
Y. Tsugawa, A. K. Jha, and J. P. Newhouse, JAMA Internal Medicine, March 2017 (published online).

Per Capita Caps in Medicaid — Lessons from the Past
A. J. Goodman-Bacon and S. S. Nikpay, New England Journal of Medicine, 376, March 2017, pp. 1005-7.

Making Health Care Markets Work: Competition Policy for Health Care
M. Gaynor, F. Mostashari, and P. B. Ginsburg, JAMA, 317(13), April 2017, pp. 1313-4.

A Mixed Methods Study of Clinical Information Availability in Obstetric Triage and Prenatal Offices
C. Meyerhoefer, S. A. Sherer, M. E. Deily, S.-Y. Chou, L. Peng, T. Hu, M. Nihen, M. Sheinberg, and D. Levick, Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 24(e1), April 2017, pp. e87-94.

The High and Rising Costs of Obesity to the U.S. Health Care System
A. Biener, J. Cawley, and C. Meyerhoefer, Journal of General Internal Medicine, 32(Suppl. 1), April 2017, pp. 6-8.

Health and Health Care Use among Individuals at Risk to Lose Health Insurance with Repeal of the Affordable Care Act
P. Karaca-Mandic, A. B. Jena, and J. S. Ross, JAMA Internal Medicine, 177(4), April 2017, pp. 590-3.

Why the U.S. Science and Engineering Workforce Is Aging Rapidly
D. M. Blau and B. A. Weinberg, PNAS, 114(15), April 2017, pp. 3879-84.

Replacing the Affordable Care Act: Lessons from Behavioral Economics
J. S. Skinner and K. G. Volpp, JAMA, April 2017 (published online).

Drug Involvement in Fatal Overdoses
C. J. Ruhm, SSM - Population Health, 3, December 2017, pp. 219-26.

Submissions from 2016

Incorporating Environmental Outcomes into a Health Economic Model
K. Marsh, M. Ganz, E. Nørtoft, N. Lund, and J. Graff-Zivin, International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, 32(6), January 2016, pp. 400-6.

How Smoking Affects the Proportion of Deaths Attributable to Obesity: Assessing the Role of Relative Risks and Weight Distributions
A. Stokes and S. Preston, BMJ Open, 6(2), February 2016.

Asymmetric Thinking about Return on Investment
D. A. Asch, M. V. Pauly, and R. W. Muller, New England Journal of Medicine, 374, February 2016, pp. 606-8.

Are Major Behavioral and Sociodemographic Risk Factors for Mortality Additive or Multiplicative in Their Effects?
N. Mehta and S. Preston, Social Science & Medicine, 154, April 2016, pp. 93-9.

Early-Life Exposure to the Great Smog of 1952 and the Development of Asthma
P. Bharadwaj, J. Graff Zivin, J. T. Mullins, and M. Neidell, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 194(12), December 2016, pp. 1475-82.



 
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