NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Shi-Tse Lo

McGill University

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NBER Working Papers and Publications

April 2009Does it Matter Who Has the Right to Patent: First-to-invent or First-to-file? Lessons From Canada
with Dhanoos Sutthiphisal: w14926
A switch to a first-to-file patent regime from its first-to-invent system has become imminent for the U.S. To learn about probable effects of such a policy change, we examine a similar switch that occurred in Canada in 1989. We find that the switch failed to stimulate Canadian R&D efforts. Nor did it have any effects on overall patenting. However, the reforms had a small adverse effect on domestic-oriented industries and skewed the ownership structure of patented inventions towards large corporations, away from independent inventors and small businesses. These findings challenge the merits of adopting a first-to-file patent regime.
May 2008Crossover Inventions And Knowledge Diffusion Of General Purpose Technologies? Evidence From The Electrical Technology
with Dhanoos Sutthiphisal: w14043
Scholars have long noted the significant impact of general purpose technologies (GPTs) on the economy. However, limited attention has been paid to exploring how they are employed to generate inventions in downstream sectors (crossover inventions), and what factors may facilitate such diffusion. We study these issues by examining the introduction of one of the widely regarded GPTs -- electrical technology -- in the late 19th century U.S. We find that knowledge spillovers between industries (inter-industry spillovers and learning-by-using) had little influence on the geography of crossover inventions as well as the speed and productivity of inventors at making them. Instead, appropriate human capital and an environment promoting inventions in general played a more important role.

Published: The Journal of Economic History The Journal of Economic History / Volume 70 / Issue 03 / September 2010, pp 744-764 Copyright © The Economic History Association 2010 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022050710000604 (About DOI), Published online: 06 September 2010

 
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