Raül Santaeulàlia-Llopis

MOVE, UAB, and Barcelona GSE
Plaza Civica s/n
Bellaterra, Barcelona


NBER Working Papers and Publications

November 2017The Effects of Land Markets on Resource Allocation and Agricultural Productivity
with Chaoran Chen, Diego Restuccia: w24034
We assess the role of land markets on factor misallocation in Ethiopia—where land is owned by the state—by exploiting policy-driven variation in land rentals across time and space arising from a recent land certification reform. Our main finding from detailed micro data is that land rentals significantly reduce misallocation and increase agricultural productivity. These effects are nonlinear across farms—impacting more those farms farther away from their efficient operational scale. The effect of land rentals on productivity is 70 percent larger when controlling for non-market rentals—those with a pre-harvest rental rate of zero. Land rentals significantly increase the adoption of new technologies, especially fertilizer use.
February 2017Land Misallocation and Productivity
with Diego Restuccia: w23128
Using detailed household-level data from Malawi on physical quantities of outputs and inputs in agricultural production, we measure total factor productivity (TFP) for farms controlling for land quality, rain, and other transitory shocks. We find that operated land size and capital are essentially unrelated to farm TFP implying substantial factor misallocation. The aggregate agricultural output gain from a reallocation of factors to their efficient use among existing farmers is a factor of 3.6-fold. We directly link factor misallocation to severely restricted land markets as the vast majority of land is allocated by village chiefs and not marketed. In particular, the output gain from reallocation are 2.6 times larger for farms with no marketed land than for farms that only operate marketed...
September 2009Methods versus Substance: Measuring the Effects of Technology Shocks on Hours
with José-Víctor Ríos-Rull, Frank Schorfheide, Cristina Fuentes-Albero, Maxym Kryshko: w15375
In this paper, we employ both calibration and modern (Bayesian) estimation methods to assess the role of neutral and investment-specific technology shocks in generating fluctuations in hours. Using a neoclassical stochastic growth model, we show how answers are shaped by the identification strategies and not by the statistical approaches. The crucial parameter is the labor supply elasticity. Both a calibration procedure that uses modern assessments of the Frisch elasticity and the estimation procedures result in technology shocks accounting for 2% to 9% of the variation in hours worked in the data. We infer that we should be talking more about identification and less about the choice of particular quantitative approaches.

Published: \Methods versus Substance: Measuring the E ects of Technology Shocks on Hours" joint with Frank Schorfheide, Cristina Fuentes-Albero, Raul Santaeulalia-Llopis and Maxym Kryshko. Journal of Monetary Economics Vol. 59, Issue 8, December 2012, pp. 826-46.

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