NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Nicolas Petrosky-Nadeau

Carnegie Mellon University
Tepper School of Business
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15206

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org

NBER Working Papers and Publications

July 2013Unemployment Crises
with Lu Zhang: w19207
A search and matching model, when calibrated to the mean and volatility of unemployment in the postwar sample, can potentially explain the large unemployment dynamics in the Great Depression. The limited response of wages to labor market conditions from credible bargaining and the congestion externality from matching frictions cause the unemployment rate to rise sharply in recessions but decline gradually in booms. The frequency, severity, and persistence of unemployment crises in the model are quantitatively consistent with U.S. historical time series.
Solving the DMP Model Accurately
with Lu Zhang: w19208
An accurate global algorithm is critical for quantifying the dynamics of the Diamond-Mortensen-Pissarides model. Loglinearization understates the mean and volatility of unemployment, overstates the unemployment-vacancy correlation, and ignores impulse responses that are an order of magnitude larger in recessions than in booms. Although improving on loglinearization, the second-order perturbation in logs also induces large errors. We demonstrate these insights in the context of Hagedorn and Manovskii (2008). Once solved accurately, their small surplus calibration fails to explain the Shimer (2005) puzzle. While the volatility of labor market tightness is close to the data, the unemployment volatility is too high.
January 2012An Equilibrium Asset Pricing Model with Labor Market Search
with Lars-Alexander Kuehn, Lu Zhang: w17742
Search frictions in the labor market help explain the equity premium in the financial market. We embed the Diamond-Mortensen-Pissarides search framework into a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model with recursive preferences. The model produces a sizeable equity premium of 4.54% per annum with a low interest rate volatility of 1.34%. The equity premium is strongly countercyclical, and forecastable with labor market tightness, a pattern we confirm in the data. Intriguingly, search frictions, combined with a small labor surplus and large job destruction flows, give rise endogenously to rare disaster risks a la Rietz (1988) and Barro (2006).
 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us