NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Matthew Freedman

University of California, Irvine
Department of Economics
3151 Social Science Plaza
Irvine, CA 92697

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NBER Working Papers and Publications

May 2018Is Your Lawyer a Lemon? Incentives and Selection in the Public Provision of Criminal Defense
with Amanda Agan, Emily Owens: w24579
Governments in the U.S. must offer free legal services to low-income people accused of crimes. These services are frequently provided by assigned counsel, who handle cases for indigent defendants on a contract basis. Court-assigned attorneys generally garner worse case outcomes than privately retained attorneys. Using detailed court records from one large jurisdiction in Texas, we find that the disparities in outcomes are primarily attributable to case characteristics and within-attorney differences across cases in which they are assigned versus retained. The selection of low-quality lawyers into assigned counsel and endogenous matching in the private market contribute less to the disparities.
August 2006Reaching for the Stars: Who Pays for Talent in Innovative Industries?
with Fredrik Andersson, John C. Haltiwanger, Julia Lane, Kathryn L. Shaw: w12435
Innovation in the U.S. economy is about employing and rewarding highly talented workers to produce new products. Using unique longitudinal matched employer-employee data, this paper makes a key connection between talent and firms in markets with risky product innovations. We show that software firms that operate in product markets with highly skewed returns to innovation, or high variance payoffs, are more likely to attract and pay for star workers. Thus, firms in high variance product markets pay more up-front--in starting salaries--to attract and motivate star employees, because if these star workers produce home-run innovations, the firm's winnings will be huge. However, we also find these same firms pay highly for loyalty: star workers that stay with a firm have much higher earnin...

Published: Fredrik Andersson & Matthew Freedman & John Haltiwanger & Julia Lane & Kathryn Shaw, 2009. "Reaching for the Stars: Who Pays for Talent in Innovative Industries?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(538), pages F308-F332, 06. citation courtesy of

 
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