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NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Katherine Casey

Stanford University
Graduate School of Business
655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305

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NBER Program Affiliations: DEV
NBER Affiliation: Faculty Research Fellow

NBER Working Papers and Publications

September 2018Skill versus Voice in Local Development
with Rachel Glennerster, Edward Miguel, Maarten Voors: w25022
Where the state is weak, traditional authorities often control the local provision of land, justice, and public goods. These authorities are criticized for ruling in an undemocratic and unaccountable fashion, and are typically quite old and poorly educated relative to younger cohorts who have benefited from recent schooling expansions. We experimentally evaluate two solutions to these problems in rural Sierra Leone: an expensive long-term intervention to make local institutions more inclusive; and a low-cost test to rapidly identify skilled technocrats and delegate project management to them. In a real-world competition for local infrastructure grants, we find that technocratic selection dominates both the status quo of chiefly control and the institutional reform intervention, leading to ...
May 2014Healing the Wounds: Learning from Sierra Leone's Postwar Institutional Reforms
with Rachel Glennerster, Edward Miguel
in African Successes, Volume I: Government and Institutions, Sebastian Edwards, Simon Johnson, and David N. Weil, editors
While its recent history of civil war, chronic poverty and corrupt governance would cause many to dismiss Sierra Leone as a hopeless case, the country's economic and political performance over the last decade has defied expectations. We examine how several factors--including the legacy of war, ethnic diversity, decentralization and community-driven development (CDD)--have shaped local institutions and national political dynamics. The story that emerges is a nuanced one: war does not necessarily destroy the capacity for local collective action; ethnicity affects residential choice, but does not impede local public goods provision; while politics remain heavily ethnic, voters are willing to cross ethnic boundaries when they have better information about candidates; decentralization can work ...
September 2012Healing the Wounds: Learning from Sierra Leone's Post-war Institutional Reforms
with Rachel Glennerster, Edward Miguel: w18368
While its recent history of civil war, chronic poverty and corrupt governance would cause many to dismiss Sierra Leone as a hopeless case, the country's economic and political performance over the last decade has defied expectations. We examine how several factors--including the legacy of war, ethnic diversity, decentralization and community-driven development (CDD)--have shaped local institutions and national political dynamics. The story that emerges is a nuanced one: war does not necessarily destroy the capacity for local collective action; ethnicity affects residential choice, but does not impede local public goods provision; while politics remain heavily ethnic, voters are willing to cross ethnic boundaries when they have better information about candidates; decentralization can wor...

Published: Georgina Casey, 1998. "Wound healing," Primary Health Care, vol 8(10), pages 31-36.

May 2011Reshaping Institutions: Evidence on Aid Impacts Using a Pre-Analysis Plan
with Rachel Glennerster, Edward Miguel: w17012
Although institutions are believed to be key determinants of economic performance, there is limited evidence on how they can be successfully reformed. Evaluating the effects of specific reforms is complicated by the lack of exogenous variation in the presence of institutions; the difficulty of empirically measuring institutional performance; and the temptation to "cherry pick" a few novel treatment effect estimates from amongst the large number of indicators required to capture the complex and multi-faceted subject. We evaluate one attempt to make local institutions more egalitarian by imposing minority participation requirements in Sierra Leone and test for longer term learning-by-doing effects. In so doing, we address these three pervasive challenges by: exploiting the random assignment ...

Published: Katherine Casey & Rachel Glennerster & Edward Miguel, 2012. "Reshaping Institutions: Evidence on Aid Impacts Using a Preanalysis Plan," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(4), pages 1755-1812. citation courtesy of

 
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