NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Jorge Balat

Johns Hopkins University
Department of Economics
Mergenthaler Hall 459
3400 N. Charles St.
Baltimore, MD 21218
Office Phone: (410) 516-5767

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NBER Working Papers and Publications

September 2007Realizing the Gains From Trade: Export Crops, Marketing Costs, and Poverty
with Irene Brambilla, Guido Porto: w13395
This paper explores the role of export costs in the process of poverty reduction in rural Africa. We claim that the marketing costs that emerge when the commercialization of export crops requires intermediaries can lead to lower participation into export cropping and, thus, to higher poverty. We test the model using data from the Uganda National Household Survey. We show that: i) farmers living in villages with fewer outlets for sales of agricultural exports are likely to be poorer than farmers residing in market-endowed villages; ii) market availability leads to increased household participation in export cropping (coffee, tea, cotton, fruits); iii) households engaged in export cropping are less likely to be poor than subsistence-based households. We conclude that the availability of mark...

Published: Balat, Jorge & Brambilla, Irene & Porto, Guido, 2009. "Realizing the gains from trade: Export crops, marketing costs, and poverty," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(1), pages 21-31, June. citation courtesy of

March 2007Globalization and Complementary Policies: Poverty Impacts on Rural Zambia
with Guido G. Porto
in Globalization and Poverty, Ann Harrison, editor
March 2005Globalization and Complementary Policies: Poverty Impacts in Rural Zambia
with Guido Porto: w11175
In this paper, we have two main objectives: to investigate the links between globalization and poverty observed in Zambia during the 1990s, and to explore the poverty impacts of non-traditional export growth. We look at consumption and income effects separately. On the consumption side, we study the maize marketing reforms and the elimination of maize subsidies. We find that complementary policies matter: the introduction of competition policies at the milling industry acted as a cushion that benefited consumers but the restriction on maize imports by small-scale mills hurt them. On the income side, we study agricultural export growth to estimate income gains from international trade. The gains are associated with market agriculture activities (such as growing cotton, tobacco, hybrid maize...

Published: Jorge F. Balat & Guido G. Porto, 2007. "Globalization and Complementary Policies: Poverty Impacts on Rural Zambia," NBER Chapters, in: Globalization and Poverty, pages 373-416 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

 
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