NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Jonathan Pritchett

Department of Economics
206 Tilton Hall
Tulane University
New Orleans, Louisiana 701 18-5698

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org

NBER Working Papers and Publications

November 2013Betting on Secession: Quantifying Political Events Surrounding Slavery and the Civil War
with Charles W. Calomiris: w19625
Abraham Lincoln's election produced Southern secession, Civil War, and abolition. Using a new database of slave sales from New Orleans, we examine the connections between political news and the prices of slaves for 1856-1861. We find that slave prices declined by roughly a third from their 1860 peak, reflecting increased southern pessimism regarding the possibility of war and the war's possible outcome. The South's decision to secede reflected the beliefs that the North would not invade to oppose secession, and that emancipation of slaves without compensation was unlikely, both of which were subsequently dashed by Lincoln's actions.

Published: Betting on Secession: Quantifying Political Events Surrounding Slavery and the Civil War Charles W. Calomiris Jonathan Pritchett AMERICAN ECONOMIC REVIEW VOL. 106, NO. 1, JANUARY 2016 (pp. 1-23) citation courtesy of

August 2008Preserving Slave Families for Profit: Traders' Incentives and Pricing in the New Orleans Slave Market
with Charles Calomiris: w14281
We investigate the determinants of slave family discounts, using data from the New Orleans slave market. We find large price discounts for families which cannot be explained by scale effects, childcare costs, legal restrictions, or transport costs. Because family members cared for each other, sellers found it advantageous to keep some families together. Evidence from the manifests of ships carrying slaves to be sold in New Orleans provides direct evidence for our model of selectivity bias in explaining slave family discounts. Children likely to have been shipped with their mothers are 1-2 inches shorter than other children.

Published: Calomiris, Charles W. & Pritchett, Jonathan B., 2009. "Preserving Slave Families for Profit: Traders' Incentives and Pricing in the New Orleans Slave Market," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(04), pages 986-1011, December. citation courtesy of

 
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