NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Jesse Perla

University of British Columbia
Vancouver School of Economics
997 - 1873 East Mall
Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1

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NBER Working Papers and Publications

January 2017Reconciling Models of Diffusion and Innovation: A Theory of the Productivity Distribution and Technology Frontier
with Jess Benhabib, Christopher Tonetti: w23095
We study how innovation and technology diffusion interact to endogenously determine the productivity distribution and generate aggregate growth. We model firms that choose to innovate, adopt technology, or produce with their existing technology. Costly adoption creates a spread between the best and worst technologies concurrently used to produce similar goods. The balance of adoption and innovation determines the shape of the distribution; innovation stretches the distribution, while adoption compresses it. Whether and how innovation and diffusion contribute to aggregate growth depends on the support of the productivity distribution. With finite support, the aggregate growth rate cannot exceed the maximum growth rate of innovators. Infinite support allows for “latent growth”: extra growth ...
January 2015Equilibrium Technology Diffusion, Trade, and Growth
with Christopher Tonetti, Michael E. Waugh: w20881
We study how opening to trade affects economic growth in a model where heterogeneous firms can choose to adopt a new technology already in use by other firms. We characterize the growth rate using summary statistics of the profit distribution—the ratio of profits between the average and marginal adopting firm. Opening to trade increases the spread in profits through increased export opportunities and foreign competition, induces more rapid technology adoption, and generates faster growth. Quantitatively, opening to trade yields large increases in growth, but welfare effects are muted due to loss of variety and reallocation of labor away from production.
May 2012Catch-up and Fall-back through Innovation and Imitation
with Jess Benhabib, Christopher Tonetti: w18091
Will fast growing emerging economies sustain rapid growth rates until they "catch-up" to the technology frontier? Are there incentives for some developed countries to free-ride off of innovators and optimally "fallback" relative to the frontier? This paper models agents growing as a result of investments in innovation and imitation. Imitation facilitates technology diffusion, with the productivity of imitation modeled by a catch-up function that increases with distance to the frontier. The resulting equilibrium is an endogenous segmentation between innovators and imitators, where imitating agents optimally choose to "catch-up" or "fall-back" to a productivity ratio below the frontier.

Published: Jess Benhabib & Jesse Perla & Christopher Tonetti, 2014. "Catch-up and fall-back through innovation and imitation," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 1-35, March. citation courtesy of

 
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