NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Jeff Biddle

Department of Economics
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI 48824-1038

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org

NBER Working Papers and Publications

November 2018Taking Time Use Seriously: Income, Wages And Price Discrimination
with Daniel S. Hamermesh: w25308
The American Time Use Survey 2003-15, the French Enquête Emploi du Temps, 2009-10, and the German Zeitverwendungserhebung, 2012-13, have sufficient observations to allow examining the theory of household production in much more detail than ever before. We identify income effects on time use by non-workers, showing that relatively time-intensive commodities—sleep and TV-watching—are inferior. For workers we identify income and substitution effects separately, with both in the same direction on these commodities as the income effects among non-workers. We rationalize the results by generalizing Becker’s (1965) “commodity production” model, allowing both substitution between time and goods in household production and substitution among commodities in utility functions. We then use the evidenc...
May 2016Theory and Measurement: Emergence, Consolidation and Erosion of a Consensus
with Daniel S. Hamermesh: w22253
We identify three separate stages in the post-World War II history of applied microeconomic research: A generally non-mathematical period; a period of consensus (from the 1960s through the early 1990s) characterized by the use of mathematical models, optimization and equilibrium to generate and test hypotheses about economic behavior; and (from the late 1990s) a partial abandonment of economic theory in applied work in the “experimentalist paradigm.” We document the changes implied by the changing paradigms in the profession by coding the content of all applied micro articles published in the “Top 5 journals” in 1951-55, 1974-75 and 2007-08. We also show that, despite the partial abandonment of theory by applied microeconomists, the labor market for economists still pays a wage premium to ...

Published: Jeff E. Biddle & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2017. "Theory and Measurement," History of Political Economy, vol 49(Supplement), pages 34-57.

August 2011Cycles of Wage Discrimination
with Daniel S. Hamermesh: w17326
Using CPS data from 1979-2009 we examine how cyclical downturns and industry-specific demand shocks affect wage differentials between white non-Hispanic males and women, Hispanics and African-Americans. Women's and Hispanics' relative earnings are harmed by negative shocks, while the earnings disadvantage of African-Americans may drop with negative shocks. Negative shocks also appear to increase the earnings disadvantage of bad-looking workers. A theory of job search suggests two opposite-signed mechanisms that affect these wage differentials. It suggests greater absolute effects among job-movers, which is verified using the longitudinal component of the CPS.

Published: "Wage discrimination over the business cycle." Jeff E Biddle and Daniel S Hamermesh. Journal of Labor Policy, 2013 2:7

October 2010Comment on "Emerging Labor Market Trends and Workplace Safety and Health"
in Labor in the New Economy, Katharine G. Abraham, James R. Spletzer, and Michael Harper, editors
 
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