NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Doireann Fitzgerald

Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis
90 Hennepin Ave
Minneapolis, MN 55401

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Institutional Affiliation: Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis

NBER Working Papers and Publications

July 2018How Do Firms Build Market Share?
with Anthony Priolo: w24794
The question of how firms build market share matters for firm dynamics, business cycles, international trade, and industrial organization. Using Nielsen Retail Scanner data for the United States, we document that in the consumer food industry, brands experience substantial growth in market share in the first four years after successful entry into a regional market. However, markups are flat with respect to brand tenure. This finding is at odds with a large literature on customer markets which argues that firms acquire customers by temporarily offering low markups, and later raise markups once customers are locked in. However, it is consistent with a literature which emphasizes the importance of marketing and advertising activities for building market share.
January 2016How Exporters Grow
with Stefanie Haller, Yaniv Yedid-Levi: w21935
We show that in successful episodes of export market entry, there are statistically and economically significant post-entry dynamics of quantities, but no post-entry dynamics of markups. This suggests that shifts in demand play an important role in successful entry, but that firms do not use dynamic manipulation of markups as an instrument to shift demand. We structurally estimate two competing models of customer base accumulation to match these moments. In the first model, firms use marketing and advertising to acquire new customers and thereby shift demand and increase sales. In the second, they use temporarily low markups to do so. The marketing and advertising model fits the quantity and markup moments well, and implies that successful entry is associated with high selling expenses. Th...
March 2014Exporters and Shocks: Dissecting the International Elasticity Puzzle
with Stefanie Haller: w19968
We use micro data for Ireland to estimate how export participation and the export revenue of incumbent exporters respond to tariffs and real exchange rates. Both participation and revenue, but especially revenue, are more responsive to tariffs than to real exchange rates. Our estimates translate into an elasticity of aggregate exports with respect to tariffs of between -3.8 and -5.4, and with respect to real exchange rates of between 0.45 and 0.6, consistent with estimates in the literature based on aggregate data. We argue that forward-looking investment in customer base combined with the fact that tariffs are much more predictable than real exchange rates can explain why export revenue responds so much more to tariffs.

Published: Doireann Fitzgerald & Stefanie Haller, 2018. "Exporters and Shocks," Journal of International Economics, .

July 2004Specialization, Factor Accumulation and Development
with Juan Carlos Hallak: w10638
We estimate the effect of factor proportions on the pattern of manufacturing specialization in a cross-section of OECD countries, taking into account that factor accumulation responds to productivity. We show that the failure to control for productivity differences produces biased estimates. Our model explains 2/3 of the observed differences in the pattern of specialization between the poorest and richest OECD countries. However, because factor proportions and the pattern of specialization co-move in the development process, their strong empirical relationship is not sufficient to determine whether specialization is driven by factor proportions, or by other mechanisms also correlated with level of development.

Published: Fitzgerald, Doireann and Juan Carlos Hallak. "Specialization, Factor Accumulation And Development," Journal of International Economics, 2004, v64(2,Dec), 277-302. citation courtesy of

 
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