NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Casey Warman

Department of Economics
Dalhousie University
6214 University Avenue, Room A23
Halifax, NS B3H 4R2
CANADA
Tel: 902/494-4252
Fax: 902/494-6917

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org
WWW:
NBER Program Affiliations: HE
NBER Affiliation: Faculty Research Fellow

NBER Working Papers and Publications

October 2016Local Labor Markets in Canada and the United States
with David Albouy, Chandler Lutz
in Public Policies in Canada and the United States, Philip Oreopoulos and David Card, organizers
June 2015Technological Change, Occupational Tasks and Declining Immigrant Outcomes: Implications for Earnings and Income Inequality in Canada
with Christopher Worswick: w21307
The earnings and occupational task requirements of immigrants to Canada are analyzed. The growing education levels of immigrants in the 1990s have not led to a large improvement in earnings as one might expect if growing computerization and the resulting technological change was leading to a rising return to non-routine cognitive skills and a greater wage return to university education. Controlling for education, we find a pronounced cross-arrival cohort decline in earnings that coincided with cross-cohort declines in cognitive occupational task requirements and cross-cohort increases in manual occupational task requirements. The immigrant earnings outcomes had only a small effect on overall Canadian earnings inequality.

Published: Casey Warman & Christopher Worswick, 2015. "Technological change, occupational tasks and declining immigrant outcomes: Implications for earnings and income inequality in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 48(2), pages 736-772, May. citation courtesy of

May 2012Quality of Life, Firm Productivity, and the Value of Amenities across Canadian Cities
with David Albouy, Fernando Leibovici: w18103
We present hedonic general-equilibrium estimates of quality-of-life and productivity differences across Canada's metropolitan areas. These are based off of the estimated willingness-to-pay of heterogeneous households and firms to locate in various cities, which differ in their wage levels, housing costs, and land values. Using 2006 Canadian Census data, our metropolitan quality-of-life estimates are somewhat consistent with popular rankings, but find Canadians care more about climate and culture. Quality-of-life is highest in Victoria for Anglophones, Montreal for Francophones, and Vancouver for Allophones, and lowest in more remote cities. Toronto is Canada's most productive city; Vancouver is the overall most valuable city.

Published: David Albouy & Fernando Leibovici & Casey Warman, 2013. "Quality of life, firm productivity, and the value of amenities across Canadian cities," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(2), pages 379-411, May. citation courtesy of

March 2010Public-Place Smoking Laws and Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS)
with Christopher Carpenter, Sabina Postolek: w15849
Public-place smoking restrictions are the most important non-price tobacco control measures worldwide, yet surprisingly little is known about their effects on exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). We study these laws in Canada using data with questions about respondents' ETS exposure in public and private places. In fixed-effects models we find these laws had no effects on smoking but induced large and statistically significant reductions in public-place ETS exposure, especially in bars and restaurants. We do not find significant evidence of ETS displacement to private homes. Our results indicate wide latitude for health improvements from banning smoking in public places.

Published: Christopher Carpenter & Sabina Postolek & Casey Warman, 2011. "Public-Place Smoking Laws and Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS)," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 35-61, August. citation courtesy of

 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
NBER Videos
Themes
Data
People
About

National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us