NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Brian Duncan

Department of Economics
University of Colorado
Campus Box 181
Denver, CO 80217-3364

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NBER Working Papers and Publications

February 2016The Complexity of Immigrant Generations: Implications for Assessing the Socioeconomic Integration of Hispanics and Asians
with Stephen J. Trejo: w21982
Because of data limitations, virtually all studies of the later-generation descendants of immigrants rely on subjective measures of ethnic self-identification rather than arguably more objective measures based on the countries of birth of the respondent and his ancestors. In this context, biases can arise from “ethnic attrition” (e.g., U.S.-born individuals who do not self-identify as Hispanic despite having ancestors who were immigrants from a Spanish-speaking country). Analyzing 2003-2013 data from the Current Population Survey (CPS), this study shows that such ethnic attrition is sizeable and selective for the second- and third-generation populations of key Hispanic and Asian national origin groups. In addition, the results indicate that ethnic attrition generates measurement biases ...

Published: Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo, 2017. "The Complexity of Immigrant Generations: Implications for Assessing the Socioeconomic Integration of Hispanics and Asians," ILR Review, vol 70(5), pages 1146-1175.

May 2007Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans
with Stephen J. Trejo
in Mexican Immigration to the United States, George J. Borjas, editor
June 2005Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans
with Stephen J. Trejo: w11423
Using Census and CPS data, we show that U.S.-born Mexican Americans who marry non-Mexicans are substantially more educated and English proficient, on average, than are Mexican Americans who marry co-ethnics (whether they be Mexican Americans or Mexican immigrants). In addition, the non-Mexican spouses of intermarried Mexican Americans possess relatively high levels of schooling and English proficiency, compared to the spouses of endogamously married Mexican Americans. The human capital selectivity of Mexican intermarriage generates corresponding differences in the employment and earnings of Mexican Americans and their spouses. Moreover, the children of intermarried Mexican Americans are much less likely to be identified as Mexican than are the children of endogamous Mexican marriages. ...

Published: Ethnic Identification, Intermarriage, and Unmeasured Progress by Mexican Americans , Brian Duncan, Stephen J. Trejo. in Mexican Immigration to the United States, Borjas. 2007

 
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