NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

Arnold M. Epstein

School of Public Health
Harvard University
Boston, MA 02115

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NBER Working Papers and Publications

June 2000How Good a Deal Was the Tobacco Settlement?: Assessing Payments to Massachusetts
with David M. Cutler, Richard G. Frank, Raymond Hartman, Charles King III, Joseph P. Newhouse, Meredith B. Rosenthal, Elizabeth Richardson Vigdor: w7747
We estimate the increment in Massachusetts Medicaid program costs attributable to smoking from December 20, 1991, to 1998. We describe how our methods improve upon earlier estimates of analogous costs at the national level. Current costs to the Massachusetts Medicaid program approximate the payments to Massachusetts under the tobacco settlement of November 1998. Whether these payments are viewed as appropriate compensation for Medicaid costs over time depends upon the rate of increase in future health care costs, the rate of decline in smoking, the proportion of smoking that should be attributed to the actions of the tobacco companies and the liklihood that state would have prevailed at trial. The costs to the Medicaid program are dwarfed by the internal costs to smokers themselves.

Published: Cutler, David M, et al, 2000. " How Good a Deal Was the Tobacco Settlement? Assessing Payments to Massachusetts," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 21(2-3), pages 235-61, November. citation courtesy of

September 1997Is Price Inflation Different for the Elderly? An Empirical Analysis of Prescription Drugs
with Ernst R. Berndt, Iain M. Cockburn, Douglas L. Cocks, Zvi Griliches: w6182
Using annual IMS data from 1990 to 1996, we examine empirically whether whether elderly-nonelderly price inflation differentials exist for one medical item, namely, prescription pharmaceuticals. We assess prices for Rx for Rx drugs destined for ultimate use by the elderly vs. the nonelderly at three points in the distribution chain: initial sales from manufacturers, intermediate purchases by retail pharmacies, and final sales from retail pharmacies to patients/payors. We find that at the initial point in the distribution chain, there are no differences in price inflation for the aggregate of drugs destined for use by the elderly vs. the nonelderly. At the intermediate sell-in to pharmacy distribution point, we examine antibiotics (ABs), antidepressants (ADs) and calcium channel blockers ...

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