NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Alan de Bromhead

Queen's Management School
Riddel Hall
185 Stranmillis Road
Belfast
BT9 5EE
United Kingdom

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NBER Working Papers and Publications

January 2018The Anatomy of a Trade Collapse: The UK, 1929-33
with Alan Fernihough, Markus Lampe, Kevin Hjortshøj O'Rourke: w24252
A recent literature explores the nature and causes of the collapse in international trade during 2008 and 2009. The decline was particularly great for automobiles and industrial supplies; it occurred largely along the intensive margin; quantities fell by more than prices; and prices fell less for differentiated products. Do these stylised facts apply to trade collapses more generally? This paper uses detailed, commodity specific information on UK imports between 1929 and 1933, to see to what extent the trade collapses of the Great Depression and Great Recession resembled each other. It also compares the free trading trade collapse of 1929-31 with the protectionist collapse of 1931-3, to see to what extent protection, and gradual recovery from the Great Depression, mattered for UK trade pat...
February 2017When Britain turned inward: Protection and the shift towards Empire in Interwar Britain
with Alan Fernihough, Markus Lampe, Kevin Hjortshøj O'Rourke: w23164
International trade became much less multilateral during the 1930s. Previous studies, looking at aggregate trade flows, have argued that discriminatory trade policies had comparatively little to do with this. Using highly disaggregated information on the UK’s imports and trade policies, we find that policy can explain the majority of Britain’s shift towards Imperial imports in the 1930s. Trade policy mattered, a lot.
February 2012Right-Wing Political Extremism in the Great Depression
with Barry Eichengreen, Kevin H. O'Rourke: w17871
We examine the impact of the Great Depression on the share of votes for right-wing anti-system parties in elections in the 1920s and 1930s. We confirm the existence of a link between political extremism and economic hard times as captured by growth or contraction of the economy. What mattered was not simply growth at the time of the election but cumulative growth performance. But the effect of the Depression on support for right-wing anti-system parties was not equally powerful under all economic, political and social circumstances. It was greatest in countries with relatively short histories of democracy, with existing extremist parties, and with electoral systems that created low hurdles to parliamentary representation. Above all, it was greatest where depressed economic conditions ...

Published: "Political Extremism in the 1920s and 1930s: Do the German Lessons Generalize?" (with Alan de Bromhead and Keven O'Rourke), Journal of Economic History (July 2013).

 
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