NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Maximilian D. Schmeiser

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Working Papers

May 2014Is Smoking Inferior? Evidence from Variation in the Earned Income Tax Credit
with Donald S. Kenkel, Carly J. Urban: w20097
In this paper we estimate the causal income elasticity of smoking participation, cessation, and cigarette demand conditional upon participation. Using an instrumental variables (IV) estimation strategy we find that smoking appears to be a normal good among low-income adults: higher instrumented income is associated with an increase in the number of cigarettes consumed and a decrease in smoking cessation. The magnitude and direction of the changes in the income coefficients from our OLS to IV estimates are consistent with the hypothesis that correlational estimates between income and smoking related outcomes are biased by unobservable characteristics that differentiate higher income smokers from lower income smokers.
May 2009Differences in the U.S. Trends in the Prevalence of Obesity Based on Body Mass Index and Skinfold Thickness
with Richard V. Burkhauser, John Cawley: w15005
There are several ways to measure fatness and obesity, each with its own strengths and weaknesses. The primary measure for tracking the prevalence of obesity has historically been body mass index (BMI). This paper compares long-run trends in the prevalence of obesity when obesity is defined using skinfold thickness instead of body mass index (BMI), using data from the full series of U.S. National Health Examination Surveys. The results indicate that when one uses skinfold thicknesses rather than BMI to define obesity, the rise in the prevalence of obesity is detectable ten to twenty years earlier. This underscores the importance of examining multiple measures of fatness when monitoring or otherwise studying obesity.

Published: Burkhauser, Richard V., John Cawley, and Maximilian D. Schmeiser. 2009. “The Timing of the Rise in U.S. Obesity Varies With Measure of Fatness.” Economics and Human Biology, 7(3): 307-318.

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