NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Tracy A. Falba

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Working Papers

October 2008Work Expectations, Realizations, and Depression in Older Workers
with William T. Gallo, Jody L. Sindelar: w14435
We explore the impact on depressive symptoms of deviation in actual labor force behavior at age 62 from earlier expectations. Our sample of 4,241 observations is drawn from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). We examine workers who were less than 62 years of age at the 1992 HRS baseline, and who had reached age 62 by our study endpoint, enabling comparison of actual labor force withdrawal with earlier expectations. Poisson regression were used to estimate the impact of expected full-time work status on depressive symptoms; regressions are estimated separately for those working fulltime at age 62 and those not working fulltime. We found significant effects on depression at age 62 both for full-time workers who expected not to be working full-time, and for participants not working full-t...

Published: Work expectations, realizations, and depression in older workers. Tracy A Falba, Jody L Sindelar, William T Gallo Economics Department, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA. The Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics (Impact Factor: 0.97). 12/2009; 12(4):175-86.

December 2007Impact of First Occupation on Health at Older Ages
with Jody L. Sindelar, Jason Fletcher, Patricia Keenan, William T. Gallo: w13715
Occupation is discussed as a social determinant of health. Occupation has received little attention in this light in the economics literature. We examine occupation in a life-course framework and use measures of first-occupation, initial health, and mother’s education. We contend that first occupation is a choice made relatively early in life that affects health outcomes at later ages. We examine first-occupation for two reasons: 1) there is growing evidence that early determinants affect later health and occupation has received little attention in this regard and 2) first occupation is predetermined in analysis of later health, which helps to address the issue of potential simultaneity. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) we estimate the impact of initial occupat...

Published: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2009 Jan;64(1):118-24. doi: 10.1093/geronb/gbn006. Epub 2009 Feb 4. The impact of occupation on self-rated health: cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence from the health and retirement survey. Gueorguieva R, Sindelar JL, Falba TA, Fletcher JM, Keenan P, Wu R, Gallo WT. Source Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. ralitza.gueorguieva@yale.edu

December 2004Tobacco Spending and its Crowd-Out of Other Goods
with Susan H. Busch, Mireia Jofre-Bonet, Jody L. Sindelar: w10974
Smoking is an expensive habit. Smoking households spend, on average, more than $1000 annually on cigarettes. For households in which some members smoke, smoking expenditures crowd-out other purchases, which may affect other household members, as well as the smoker. We empirically analyze how expenditures on tobacco crowd out consumption of other goods, estimating the patterns of substitution between tobacco products and other expenditures. We use the Consumer Expenditure Survey (1995 to 2001), which we complement with regional price data, and state cigarette prices. We estimate a consumer demand system of expenditures on cigarettes, food, alcohol, housing, apparel, transportation, medical care and controls for socio-economic variables and other sources of observable heterogeneity. Descript...

Published: Busch, Susan H., Mireia Jofre-Bonet, Tracy A. Falba, and Jody L. Sindelar. "Burning a Hole in the Budget: Tobacco Spending and Its Crowd-Out of Other Goods." Applied Health Economics and Health Policy 3, 4 (2004): 263-72.

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers onlyInformation about this author at RePEc

 
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