NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Mary Corcoran

Contact and additional information for this authorAll publicationsWorking Papers only

Working Papers

May 1996Sex-Based Differences in School Content and the Male/Female Wage Gap
with Charles Brown: w5580
In high school and in college, men and women take significantly different courses. Using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation and the National Longitudinal Study Class of 1972, we relate these differences in school content to sex differences in adult wages. Differences in field of highest degree account for a significant part of the male-female wage gap among college graduates, but differences in coursework account for very little of the equally large wage gap between men and women with less schooling. We find little consistent evidence that men receive larger rewards for taking traditionally male rather than traditionally female courses and majors, though there is some indication of this for college graduates.
March 1989Effects of Family and Community Background on Men's Economic Status
with Roger H. Gordon, Deborah Laren, Gary Solon: w2896
This study uses intergenerational data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to investigate the effects of family and community background on men's economic status. It is distinguished from most previous studies by its emphasis on community influences and on influences from poverty and welfare use. Also, our parental characteristics data are more comprehensive and accurate than those of many earlier studies. We find substantial disadvantages in economic status for black men, men from lower-income families, and men from more welfare-dependent families or communities. Otherwise, we do not find much evidence of community influences. This, however, might be due to the grossness of the geographic detail at which our community variables are measured.
August 1987Sibling and Intergenerational Correlations in Welfare Program Participation
with Gary Solon, Roger H. Gordon, Deborah Laren: w2334
Many previous studies have used sibling correlations to measure the effect of family background on earnings, income? and occupational status. This paper uses data on a sample of sisters to explore the importance of family background as a determinant of welfare program participation. The results show a strikingly high degree of sibling resemblance in welfare receipt. For example, a woman's estimated probability of having participated in welfare programs is .20 if her sister has not participated, but is -.66 if her sister has participated.
June 1987The Effect of Family Background on Economic Status: A Longitudinal Analysis of Sibling Correlations
with Gary Solon, Roger H. Gordon, Deborah Laren: w2282
Numerous previous studies have used sibling correlations to measure the importance of family background as a determinant of economic status. These studies. however. have been biased by several flaws: failure to separate permanent from transitory status variation (including that from measurement error). failure to account for life-cycle stage. and overly homogeneous samples. This paper presents a methodology to address these problems and applies it to longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Our main conclusion is that family background appears to exert greater influence on economic status than has been indicated by earlier research.

Contact and additional information for this authorAll publicationsWorking Papers only

 
Publications
Activities
Meetings
Data
People
About

Support
National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138; 617-868-3900; email: info@nber.org

Contact Us