NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Henry R. Hyatt

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Working Papers

June 2017Cyclical Job Ladders by Firm Size and Firm Wage
with John Haltiwanger, Lisa B. Kahn, Erika McEntarfer: w23485
We study whether workers progress up firm wage and size job ladders, and the cyclicality of this movement. Search theory predicts that workers should flow towards larger, higher paying firms. However, we see little evidence of a firm size ladder, partly because small, young firms poach workers from all other businesses. In contrast, we find strong evidence of a firm wage ladder that is highly procyclical. During the Great Recession, this firm wage ladder collapsed, with net worker reallocation to higher wage firms falling to zero. The earnings consequences from this lack of upward progression are sizable.
October 2015The Promise and Potential of Linked Employer-Employee Data for Entrepreneurship Research
with Christopher Goetz, Erika McEntarfer, Kristin Sandusky: w21639
In this paper, we highlight the potential for linked employer-employee data to be used in entrepreneurship research, describing new data on business start-ups, their founders and early employees, and providing examples of how they can be used in entrepreneurship research. Linked employer-employee data provides a unique perspective on new business creation by combining information on the business, workforce, and individual. By combining data on both workers and firms, linked data can investigate many questions that owner-level or firm-level data cannot easily answer alone - such as composition of the workforce at start-ups and their role in explaining business dynamics, the flow of workers across new and established firms, and the employment paths of the business owners themselves.

Forthcoming: The Promise and Potential of Linked Employer-Employee Data for Entrepreneurship Research, Christopher Goetz, Henry Hyatt, Erika McEntarfer, Kristin Sandusky. in Measuring Entrepreneurial Businesses: Current Knowledge and Challenges, Haltiwanger, Hurst, Miranda, and Schoar. 2016

June 2015Cyclical Reallocation of Workers Across Employers by Firm Size and Firm Wage
with John Haltiwanger, Erika McEntarfer: w21235
Do the job-to-job moves of workers contribute to the cyclicality of employment growth at different types of firms? In this paper, we use linked employer-employee data to provide direct evidence on the role of job-to-job flows in job reallocation in the U.S. economy. To guide our analysis, we look to the theoretical literature on on-the-job search, which predicts that job-to-job flows should reallocate workers from small to large firms. While this prediction is not supported by the data, we do find that job-to-job moves generally reallocate workers from lower paying to higher paying firms, and this reallocation of workers is highly procyclical. During the Great Recession, this firm wage job ladder collapsed, with net worker reallocation to higher wage firms falling to zero. We also find...
May 2014Who do Unions Target? Unionization over the Life-Cycle of U.S. Businesses
with Emin Dinlersoz, Jeremy Greenwood: w20151
What type of businesses do unions target for organizing? A dynamic model of the union organizing process is constructed to answer this question. A union monitors establishments in an industry to learn about their productivity, and decides which ones to organize and when. An establishment becomes unionized if the union targets it for organizing and wins the union certification election. The model predicts two main selection effects: unions organizing occurs in larger and more productive establishments early in their life-cycles, and among the establishments targeted for organizing, unions are more likely to win elections in smaller and less productive ones. These predictions find support in union certification election data for 1977-2007 matched with data on establishment characteristics.

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers only

 
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