NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by George Jakubson

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Working Papers

December 2009Do Trustees and Administrators Matter? Diversifying the Faculty Across Gender Lines
with Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Mirinda L. Martin, Joyce B. Main, Thomas Eisenberg: w15606
Our paper focuses on the role that the gender composition of the leaders of American colleges and universities -trustees, presidents/chancellors, and provosts/academic vice presidents - plays in influencing the rate at which academic institutions diversify their faculty across gender lines. Our analyses make use of institutional level panel data that we have collected on for a large sample of American academic institutions. We find that, other factors held constant including our estimate of the "expected" share of new hires at an institution that should be female, that institutions with female presidents/chancellors and female provosts/academic vice presidents, and those with a greater share of female trustees, increase their shares of female faculty at a more rapid rate. The magnitudes...

Published: “Diversifying the Faculty Across Gender Lines: Do Trustees and Admini strators Matter?” (with G. Jakubson, M. Martin, J. Main, and T. Eisenbe rg) Economics of Education Review (February 2012)

March 2006Program Design and Student Outcomes in Graduate Education
with Jeffrey Groen, Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Scott Condie, Albert Yung-Hsu Liu: w12064
Doctoral programs in the humanities and related social sciences are characterized by high attrition and long times-to-degree. In response to these problems, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation launched the Graduate Education Initiative (GEI) to improve the quality of graduate programs and in turn reduce attrition and shorten times-to-degree. Over a 10-year period starting in 1991, the Foundation provided a total of over $80 million to 51 departments at 10 major research universities. We estimate the impact of the GEI on attrition rates and times-to-degree using competing risk duration models and student-level data. The data span the start of the GEI and include information for students at a set of control departments. We estimate that the GEI had modest impacts on student outcomes in the expe...

Published: Groen, J., G. Jakubson, R. Ehrenberg, S. Condie, and A. Liu. “Program Design and Student Outcomes in Graduate Education.” Economics of Education Review (April 2008).

Inside the Black Box of Doctoral Education: What Program Characteristics Influence Doctoral Students' Attrition and Graduation Probabilities?
with Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Jeffrey Groen, Eric So, Joseph Price: w12065
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's Graduate Education Initiative (GEI) provided over $80 million to 51 treatment departments in the humanities and related social sciences during the 1990s to improve their PhD programs. Using survey data collected from students who entered the treatment and 50 control departments during a 15 year period that spanned the start of the GEI, we use factor analysis to group multiple aspects of PhD programs into a smaller number of characteristics and then estimate which aspects of PhD programs the GEI influenced and how these different aspects influenced attrition and graduation probabilities. From these analyses, we identify the routes via which the GEI influenced attrition and graduation rates and also indicate which aspects of PhD programs departments should c...

Published: Ehrenberg, R., G. Jakubson, J. Groen, E. So, and J. Price. “Inside the Black Box of Doctoral Education: What Program Characteristics Influence Doctoral Students Attention and Graduation Probabilities.” Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis (June 2007).

April 2003Who Bears the Growing Cost of Science at Universities?
with Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Michael J. Rizzo: w9627
Scientific research has come to dominate many American universities. Even with growing external support, increasingly the costs of scientific research are being funded out of internal university funds. Our paper explains why this is occuring, presents estimates of the magnitudes of start-up cost packages being provided to scientists and engineers and then uses panel data to estimate the impact of the growing cost of science on student/faculty ratios, faculty salaries and undergraduate tuition.We find that universities whose own expenditures on research are growing the most rapidly, ceteris paribus, have had the greatest increase in student faculty ratios and, in the private sector, higher tuition increases. Thus, undergraduate students bear part of the cost of increased institutional expen...

Published: Ehrenberg, R. and P. Stephan (eds.) Science and the University. University of Wisconsin Press, 2007.

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