NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Daniel Sullivan

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Working Papers

November 2007Mortality, Mass-Layoffs, and Career Outcomes: An Analysis using Administrative Data
with Till von Wachter: w13626
This paper uses administrative data on quarterly employment and earnings matched to death records to estimate the effects of job displacement on mortality. We find that job displacement leads to a 15-20% increase in death rates during the following 20 years. If such increases were sustained beyond this period, they would imply a loss in life expectancy of about 1.5 years for a worker displaced at age 40. These results are robust to extensive controls for sorting and selection, and are consistent with estimates of the effects of job loss on mortality pooling displaced workers and stayers that are not affected by selective job displacement. To examine the channels through which mass layoffs raise mortality, we exploit the panel nature of our data -- covering over 15 years of earnings -- to a...
July 1989Monopsony Power in the Market for Nurses
w3031
Estimates are presented of the inverse elasticity of supply of nursing services to the individual hospital, a quantity which is a natural measure of employer market power. The estimates corresponding to employment changes taking place over one year are quite high (in the neighborhood of 0.79) and even for changes taking place over three years are substantial (in the neighborhood of 0.26). The estimates do not significantly differ for hospitals in major metropolitan areas and do not depend very sensitively on the assumed form of the oligopsony equilibrium.
February 1987Measuring the Effect of Subsidized Training Programs on Movements In andOut of Employment
with David Card: w2173
We present a variety of alternative estimates of the effect of training on the probability of employment for adult male participants in the 1976 Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) program. Our results suggest that CETA participation increased the probability of employment in the three years after training by from 2 to 5 percentage points. Classroom training programs appear to have had significantly larger effects than on-the--job programs, although the estimated effects of both kinds of programs are consistently positive. We also find that movements in and out of employment for the trainees and a control group of nonparticipants are reasonably well described by a first-order Markov process, conditional on individual heterogeneity. In the context of this model, CETA participat...

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