NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Chen Lin

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Working Papers

December 2010The Real and Financial Implications of Corporate Hedging
with Murillo Campello, Yue Ma, Hong Zou: w16622
We study the implications of hedging for firm financing and investment. We do so using an extensive, hand-collected dataset on corporate hedging activities. Hedging can lower the odds of negative firm realizations, reducing the expected costs of financial distress. In theory, this should ease a firm's access to credit. Using a tax-based instrumental variable approach, we find that hedgers pay lower interest spreads and are less likely to have capital expenditure restrictions in their loan agreements. These favorable financing terms, in turn, allow hedgers to invest more. Our tests characterize two exact channels (cost of borrowing and investment restrictions) through which hedging affects corporate outcomes. The analysis we present shows that hedging has a first-order effect on firm financ...

Published: Murillo Campello & Chen Lin & Yue Ma & Hong Zou, 2011. "The Real and Financial Implications of Corporate Hedging," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(5), pages 1615-1647, October. citation courtesy of

November 2010Embezzlement Versus Bribery
with C. Simon Fan, Daniel Treisman: w16542
Corrupt officials can use their positions to enrich themselves in two ways. They can steal from the state budget—embezzling or misspending funds—or they can demand extra payments from citizens in return for services—bribery. In many circumstances, embezzlement is less distortionary than bribery. We analyze the tradeoff for governments in deciding how strictly to monitor and punish these two kinds of bureaucratic misbehavior. When bribery is more costly to economic development, governments may tolerate some embezzlement in order to reduce the extent of bribery—even though embezzlement is generally easier to detect. Embezzlement serves as a parallel to the “efficiency wage.” This logic appears to hold in China, where misappropriation of public funds by officials appears to be ubiquitous.

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