NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Catherine Hausman

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Working Papers

April 2015Welfare and Distributional Implications of Shale Gas
with Ryan Kellogg: w21115
Technological innovations in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have enabled tremendous amounts of natural gas to be extracted profitably from underground shale formations that were long thought to be uneconomical. In this paper, we provide the first estimates of broad-scale welfare and distributional implications of this supply boom. We provide new estimates of supply and demand elasticities, which we use to estimate the drop in natural gas prices that is attributable to the supply expansion. We calculate large, positive welfare impacts for four broad sectors of gas consumption (residential, commercial, industrial, and electric power), and a negative impact for producers, with variation across regions. We then examine the evidence for a gas-led "manufacturing renaissance" and fo...
May 2014The Value of Transmission in Electricity Markets: Evidence from a Nuclear Power Plant Closure
with Lucas Davis: w20186
Reliable estimates of the value of electricity transmission are critical if these heavily-regulated investments are to be made cost-effectively. In this paper, we exploit the abrupt closure of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) in February 2012. During the previous decade, SONGS had produced about 8% of the electricity generated in California, so its closure had a pronounced impact on the wholesale market, requiring large and immediate increases in generation from other sources. We find that in the months following the closure, almost all of the lost generation from SONGS was met by natural gas plants inside California at an average cost of almost $68,000 per hour. During high demand hours, we find that as much as 75% of the lost generation was met by plants located in the s...
August 2010Decomposing the Great Trade Collapse: Products, Prices, and Quantities in the 2008-2009 Crisis
with Mona Haddad, Ann Harrison: w16253
We identify a new set of stylized facts on the 2008-2009 trade collapse that we hope can be used to shed light on the importance of demand and supply-side factors in explaining the fall in trade. In particular, we decompose the fall in international trade into product entry and exit, price changes, and quantity changes for imports by Brazil, the European Union, Indonesia, and the United States. When we aggregate across all products, most of the countries analyzed experienced a decline in new products, a rise in product exit, and falls in quantity for product lines that continued to be traded. The evidence suggests that the intensive rather than extensive margin mattered the most, consistent with studies of other countries and previous recessionary periods. On average, quantities declined...

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