NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Carlos Garriga

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Working Papers

September 2016Nominal Rigidities in Debt and Product Markets
with Finn E. Kydland, Roman Ĺ ustek: w22613
Standard models used for monetary policy analysis rely on sticky prices. Recently, the literature started to explore also nominal debt contracts. Focusing on mortgages, this paper compares the two channels of transmission within a common framework. The sticky price channel is dominant when shocks to the policy interest rate are temporary, the mortgage channel is important when the shocks are persistent. The first channel has significant aggregate effects but small redistributive effects. The opposite holds for the second channel. Using yield curve data decomposed into temporary and persistent components, the redistributive and aggregate consequences are found to be quantitatively comparable.

Published: Carlos Garriga & Finn E. Kydland & Roman Sustek, 2016. "Nominal rigidities in debt and product markets," Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, Working Papers, vol 2016(17).

December 2013Mortgages and Monetary Policy
with Finn E. Kydland, Roman Sustek: w19744
Mortgages are long-term loans with nominal payments. Consequently, under incomplete asset markets, monetary policy can affect housing investment and the economy through the cost of new mortgage borrowing and real payments on outstanding debt. These channels, distinct from traditional real rate channels, are embedded in a general equilibrium model. The transmission mechanism is found to be stronger under adjustable- than fixed-rate mortgages. Further, monetary policy shocks affecting the level of the nominal yield curve have larger real effects than transitory shocks, affecting its slope. Persistently higher inflation gradually benefits homeowners under FRMs, but hurts them immediately under ARMs.
February 2013Did Housing Policies Cause the Postwar Boom in Homeownership?
with Matthew Chambers, Donald E. Schlagenhauf: w18821
After the collapse of housing markets during the Great Depression, the U.S. government played a large role in shaping the future of housing finance and policy. Soon thereafter, housing markets witnessed the largest boom in recent history. The objective in this paper is to quantify the contribution of government interventions in housing markets in the expansion of U.S. homeownership using an equilibrium model of tenure choice. In the model, home buyers have access to a menu of mortgage choices to finance the acquisition of a house. The government also provides special programs through provisions of the tax code. The parameterized model is consistent with key aggregate and distributional features observed in the 1940 U.S. economy and is capable of accounting for the boom in homeownership in ...

Published: Did Housing Policies Cause the Postwar Boom in Home Ownership?, Matthew Chambers, Carlos Garriga, Don E. Schlagenhauf. in Housing and Mortgage Markets in Historical Perspective, White, Snowden, and Fishback. 2014

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers onlyInformation about this author at RePEc

 
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