NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Brandon Dupont

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Working Papers

July 2016First Cabin Fares from New York to the British Isles, 1826-1914
with Drew Keeling, Thomas Weiss: w22426
We present a continuous time series on first cabin passenger fares for ocean travel from New York to the British Isles covering nearly a century of time. We discuss the conceptual and empirical difficulties of constructing such a time series, and examine the reasons for differences between the behavior of advertised fares and those based on passenger revenues. We find that while there are conceptual differences between these two measurements, as well as differences in the average values, the two generally moved in parallel, which means that the advertised fare series can serve as a reasonable proxy for movement of the revenue-based fares. We also find that advertised fares declined over time, roughly paralleling the drop in freight rates for U.S. bulk exports, until around 1890, but ther...
April 2016The Impact of the Civil War on Southern Wealth Holders
with Joshua Rosenbloom: w22184
The U.S. Civil War and emancipation wiped out a substantial fraction of southern wealth. The prevailing view of most economic historians, however, is that the southern planter elite was able to retain its relative status despite these shocks. Previous studies have been hampered, however, by limits on the ability to link individuals between census years, and have been forced to focus on persistence within one or a few counties. Recent advances in electronic access to the Federal Census manuscripts now make it possible to link individuals without these constraints. We exploit the ability to search the full manuscript census to construct a sample that links top wealth holders in 1870 to their 1860 census records. Although there was an entrenched southern planter elite that retained their...
April 2009Fluctuations in Overseas Travel by Americans, 1820 to 2000
with Alka Gandhi, Thomas Weiss: w14847
There were substantial fluctuations in the numbers of American overseas travelers, especially before World War II. These fluctuations in travel around the robust, long term upward trend are the focus of this paper. We first identify those fluctuations in the raw data and then try to explain the pattern of overseas travel in a quantitative way. As we show, despite the impact of a myriad of episodic events, the fluctuations in travel can be explained to a large extent by changes in the direct price of travel, changes in per capita GDP in the U.S., the extent of travel in the preceding year, and by periods of armed conflict in Europe. We attempt to explain some of the remaining variation for specific episodes in which the actual level of travel differed substantially from the predicted.
May 2008The American Invasion of Europe: The Long Term Rise in Overseas Travel, 1820-2000
with Alka Gandhi, Thomas J. Weiss: w13977
Tourism today is an activity of substantial economic importance worldwide, and has been for some time. Tourism is also of substantial economic importance in the United States, sufficient to warrant the Bureau of Economic Analysis's establishing special accounts on travel and tourism. In this paper we investigate the long term rise in overseas travel by Americans. Over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the number of Americans going abroad rose from less than 2,000 travelers to over 26 million. The industry went from one confined to the elite of American society to what some have described as mass tourism. We document this rise by compiling a long term series on overseas travel, and describe the changes in the composition of the travelers, their destinations, and their...

Published: The long-term rise in overseas travel by Americans, 1820–20001 BRANDON DUPONT1, ALKA GANDHI2, THOMAS WEISS3,‡ Article first published online: 6 JUN 2011 DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0289.2011.00610.x © Economic History Society 2011 Issue The Economic History Review The Economic History Review Volume 65, Issue 1, pages 144–167, February 2012

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers only

 
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