NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Andrew Haughwout

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Working Papers

May 2003Local Revenue Hills: Evidence from Four U.S. Cities
with Robert P. Inman, Steven Craig, Thomas Luce: w9686
We provide estimates of the impact and long-run elasticities of tax base with respect to tax rates for four large U.S. cities: Houston (property taxation), Minneapolis (property taxation), New York City (property, general sales, and income taxation), and Philadelphia (property, gross receipts, and wage taxation). Results suggest that three of our cities are near the peaks of their revenue hills; Minneapolis is the exception. A significant negative effect of a balanced budget increase in city property tax rates on city property tax base is interpreted as a capitalization effect and suggests that marginal increases in tax-financed city spending do not provide positive net benefits to property owners. Estimates of the effects of taxes on city employment levels for New York City and Philadelph...
August 2000Fiscal Policies in Open Cities with Firms and Households
with Robert P. Inman: w7823
With the renewed interest in cities as economic centers comes a need to understand how local public services and local taxes are likely to affect city economic performance. This paper provides an equilibrium model of an open city economy with mobile firms and resident workers. Given household preferences and firm technologies and an exogenous configuration of city tax rates and national grants and fiscal mandates, the model calculates equilibrium values for firm production and input use, household consumption and housing choices, city wages, rents, and population, and finally, local tax bases, revenues, and public goods provision. The model is calibrated to the Philadelphia economy for FY 1998; model predictions are compared to recent econometric estimates of the effects of city fiscal p...
March 2000Local Revenue Hills: A General Equilibrium Specification with Evidence from Four U.S. Cities
with Robert Inman, Steven Craig, Thomas Luce: w7603
We provide estimates of the impact and long-run elasticities of tax base with respect to tax rates for four large U.S. cities: Houston (property taxation), Minneapolis (property taxation), New York City (property, general sales, and income taxation), and Philadelphia (property, gross receipts, and wage taxation). Results suggest that all four of our cities are near the peaks of their longer-run revenue hills. Equilibrium effects are observed within three to four fiscal years after the initial increase in local tax rates. A significant negative impact (current period) effect of a balanced budget increase in city property tax rates on city property base is interpreted as a capitalization effect and suggests that marginal increases in city spending do not provide positive net benefits to pr...

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