NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Ian Dew-Becker

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Working Papers

September 2013Asset Pricing in the Frequency Domain: Theory and Empirics
with Ian Dew-Becker, Stefano Giglio: w19416
In affine asset pricing models, the innovation to the pricing kernel is a function of innovations to current and expected future values of an economic state variable, for example consumption growth, aggregate market returns, or short-term interest rates. The impulse response of this priced variable to fundamental shocks has a frequency (Fourier) decomposition, which captures the fluctuations induced in the priced variable at different frequencies. We show that the price of risk for a given shock can be represented as a weighted integral over that spectral decomposition. The weight assigned to each frequency then represents the frequency-specific price of risk, and is entirely determined by the preferences of investors. For example, standard Epstein-Zin preferences imply that the weight of ...
May 2008Controversies about the Rise of American Inequality: A Survey
with Robert J. Gordon, Ian Dew-Becker: w13982
This paper provides a comprehensive survey of seven aspects of rising inequality that are usually discussed separately: changes in labor's share of income; inequality at the bottom of the income distribution, including labor mobility; skill-biased technical change; inequality among high incomes; consumption inequality; geographical inequality; and international differences in the income distribution, particularly at the top. We conclude that changes in labor's share play no role in rising inequality of labor income; by one measure labor's income share was almost the same in 2007 as in 1950. Within the bottom 90 percent as documented by CPS data, movements in the 50-10 ratio are consistent with a role of decreased union density for men and of a decrease in the real minimum wage for wo...
March 2008The Role of Labor Market Changes in the Slowdown of European Productivity Growth
with Ian Dew-Becker, Robert J. Gordon: w13840
Throughout the postwar era until 1995 labor productivity grew faster in Europe than in the United States. Since 1995, productivity growth in the EU-15 has slowed while that in the United States has accelerated. But Europe's productivity growth slowdown was largely offset by faster growth in employment per capita, leaving little difference in growth of output per capita between the EU and US going back to 1980. This paper is about the strong negative tradeoff between productivity and employment growth within Europe. We document this tradeoff in the raw data, in regressions that control for the two-way causation between productivity and employment growth, and we show that there is a robust negative correlation between productivity and employment growth across countries and time. Our prim...

Published: DEW-BECKER, I., GORDON, R.. The Role of Labor-Market Changes in the Slowdown of European Productivity Growth. Review of Economics and Institutions, North America, 3, may. 2012. Available at: . Date accessed: 20 Dec. 2013.

December 2005Where Did the Productivity Growth Go? Inflation Dynamics and the Distribution of Income
with Ian Dew-Becker, Robert J. Gordon: w11842
A basic tenet of economic science is that productivity growth is the source of growth in real income per capita. But our results raise doubts by creating a direct link between macro productivity growth and the micro evolution of the income distribution. We show that over the entire period 1966-2001, as well as over 1997-2001, only the top 10 percent of the income distribution enjoyed a growth rate of real wage and salary income equal to or above the average rate of economy-wide productivity growth. Growth in median real wage and salary income barely grew at all while average wage and salary income kept pace with productivity growth, because half of the income gains went to the top 10 percent of the income distribution, leaving little left over for the bottom 90 percent. Half of this inequa...

Published: Dew-Becker, Ian and Robert J. Gordon. "Where Did The Productivity Growth Go? Inflation Dynamics And The Distribution Of Income," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, 2005, v2005(2), 67-150.

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