NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Working Papers by Anna Kovner

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Working Papers

March 2010Stressed not Frozen: The Fed Funds Market in the Financial Crisis
with Gara Afonso, Anna Kovner, Antoinette Schoar: w15806
This paper examines the impact of the financial crisis of 2008 on the federal funds market, specifically the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers. Rather than a complete collapse of lending in the presence of a market wide shock, we see that banks become more restrictive in which counterparties they lend to. After Lehman Brothers, we find that amounts and spreads become more sensitive to borrower bank characteristics. While the market does not contract dramatically, lending rates increase. Further, the market does not seem to expand to meet the increased demand predicted by the drop in other bank funding markets. We examine discount window borrowing as a proxy for unmet fed funds demand and find that the fed funds market is not indiscriminate. As expected, borrowers who access the discount window...

Stressed not Frozen: The Federal Funds Market after the Financial Crisis” joint with Gara Afonso and Anna Kovner, September 2009, The Journal of Finance, forthcoming.

June 2009Buy Local? The Geography of Successful and Unsuccessful Venture Capital Expansion
with Henry Chen, Paul Gompers, Anna Kovner, Josh Lerner: w15102
We document geographic concentration by both venture capital firms and venture capital-financed companies in three cities - San Francisco, Boston, and New York. We find that firms open new satellite offices based on the success rate of venture capital-backed investments in an area. Geography is also significantly related to outcomes. Venture capital firms based in locales that are venture capital centers outperform, regardless of the stage of the investment. Ironically, this outperformance arises from outsized performance outside of the venture capital firms' office locations, including in peripheral locations. If the goal of state and local policy makers is to encourage venture capital investment, outperformance of non-local investments suggests that policy makers might want to mitiga...

Published: Chen, Henry, Paul A. Gompers, Anna Kovner, and Josh Lerner. "Buy Local? The Geography of Successful Venture Capital Expansion." Journal of Urban Economics 67, no. 1 (January 2010).

October 2006Skill vs. Luck in Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital: Evidence from Serial Entrepreneurs
with Paul Gompers, Anna Kovner, Josh Lerner, David Scharfstein: w12592
This paper argues that a large component of success in entrepreneurship and venture capital can be attributed to skill. We show that entrepreneurs with a track record of success are more likely to succeed than first time entrepreneurs and those who have previously failed. Funding by more experienced venture capital firms enhances the chance of success, but only for entrepreneurs without a successful track record. Similarly, more experienced venture capitalists are able to identify and invest in first time entrepreneurs who are more likely to become serial entrepreneurs. Investments by venture capitalists in successful serial entrepreneurs generate higher returns for their venture capital investors. This finding provides further support for the role of skill in both entrepreneurship and ven...

Published: Gompers, Paul, Anna Kovner, Josh Lerner, and David Scharfstein. “Performance Persistence in Entrepreneurship." Journal of Financial Economics 96 (2010): 18-32. Earlier version distributed as National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper No. 12592 and Harvard Business School Working Paper No. 09-028. (Earlier Name: “Skill vs. Luck in Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital: Evidence from Serial Entrepreneurs.”)

May 2005Venture Capital Investment Cycles: The Impact of Public Markets
with Paul Gompers, Anna Kovner, Josh Lerner, David Scharfstein: w11385
It is well documented that the venture capital industry is highly volatile and that much of this volatility is associated with shifting valuations and activity in public equity markets. This paper examines how changes in public market signals affected venture capital investing between 1975 and 1998. We find that venture capitalists with the most industry experience increase their investments the most when public market signals become more favorable. Their reaction to an increase is greater than the reaction of venture capital organizations with relatively little industry experience and those with considerable experience but in other industries. The increase in investment rates does not affect the success of these transactions adversely to a significant extent. These findings are consistent...

Published: Gompers, Paul & Kovner, Anna & Lerner, Josh & Scharfstein, David, 2008. "Venture capital investment cycles: The impact of public markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 1-23, January. citation courtesy of

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers onlyInformation about this author at RePEc

 
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