NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Stefano Scarpetta

Contact and additional information for this authorAll publicationsWorking Papers only

Working Papers and Chapters

November 2009Cross-Country Differences in Productivity: The Role of Allocation and Selection
with Eric J. Bartelsman, John C. Haltiwanger: w15490
This paper combines different strands of the productivity literature to investigate the effect of idiosyncratic (firm-level) policy distortions on aggregate outcomes. On the one hand, a growing body of empirical research has been relating cross-country differences in key economic outcomes, such as productivity or output per capita, to differences in policies and institutions that shape the business environment. On the other hand, a branch of empirical research has attempted to shed light on the determinants of productivity at the firm level and the evolution of the distribution of productivity across firms within each industry. In this paper, we exploit a rich source of data with harmonized statistics on firm level variation within industries for a number of countries. Our key empirical f...
January 2009Measuring and Analyzing Cross-country Differences in Firm Dynamics
with Eric Bartelsman, John Haltiwanger
in Producer Dynamics: New Evidence from Micro Data, Timothy Dunne, J. Bradford Jensen, and Mark J. Roberts, editors
April 2008Assessing Job Flows Across Countries: The Role of Industry, Firm Size and Regulations
with John Haltiwanger, Helena Schweiger: w13920
This paper analyzes job flows in a sample of 16 industrial and emerging economies over the past decade, exploiting a harmonized firm-level dataset. It shows that industry and firm size effects (and especially firm size) account for a large fraction in the overall variability in job flows. However, large residual differences remain in the job flow patterns across countries. To account for the latter, the paper explores the role of differences in employment protection legislation across countries. Using a difference-in-difference approach that minimizes possible endogeneity and omitted variable problems, our findings show that hiring and firing costs tend to curb job flows, particularly in those industries and firm size classes that require more frequent labor adjustment.

Contact and additional information for this authorAll publicationsWorking Papers only

 
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