NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Scott Schuh

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Working Papers and Chapters

July 2014Measuring Household Spending and Payment Habits: The Role of "Typical" and "Specific" Time Frames in Survey Questions
with Marco Angrisani, Arie Kapteyn
in Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures, Christopher Carroll, Thomas Crossley, and John Sabelhaus, editors
We run an experiment in the American Life Panel where we interview individuals over five consecutive quarters and ask them to report the number of their purchases and the amount spent by debit cards, cash, credit cards, and checks. For each method of payment, a sequence of questions elicits spending behavior during a day, week, month, and year. At the time of the first interview, this sequence is randomly assigned to refer either to “specific” or to “typical” time spans. In all subsequent interviews, a “specific” sequence becomes “typical” and vice versa. In this chapter, we analyze the data from the first wave of this experiment. We show that the type (specific/typical) and length of recall periods greatly influence household reporting behavior. The volatility of household expenditure dec...
October 2007Productivity and U.S. Macroeconomic Performance: Interpreting the Past and Predicting the Future with a Two-Sector Real Business Cycle Model
with Peter N. Ireland: w13532
A two-sector real business cycle model, estimated with postwar U.S. data, identifies shocks to the levels and growth rates of total factor productivity in distinct consumption- and investment-goods-producing technologies. This model attributes most of the productivity slowdown of the 1970s to the consumption-goods sector; it suggests that a slowdown in the investment-goods sector occurred later and was much less persistent. Against this broader backdrop, the model interprets the more recent episode of robust investment and investment-specific technological change during the 1990s largely as a catch-up in levels that is unlikely to persist or be repeated anytime soon.

Published: Peter Ireland & Scott Schuh, 2008. "Productivity and U.S. Macroeconomic Performance: Interpreting the Past and Predicting the Future with a Two-Sector Real Business Cycle Model," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(3), pages 473-492, July. citation courtesy of

January 2000Job Creation, Job Destruction, and the Real Exchange Rate
with Michael W. Klein, Robert K. Triest: w7466
This paper contributes to an understanding of internationally generated adjustment costs by demonstrating a statistically significant and economically relevant effect of the real exchange rate on job creation and job destruction in U.S. manufacturing industries over the period 1973 to 1993. The responsiveness of these gross job flows to the real exchange rate reflects pervasive heterogeneity with respect to international conditions across firms, even within narrowly defined industries. We document this heterogeneity and show that the responsiveness of job flows to movements in the real exchange rate varies with the industry's openness to international trade. We also show an asymmetry in the responsiveness of job flows to the real exchange rate; appreciations play a significant role in jo...

Published: Published as "The Real Exchange Rate and Foreign Direct Investment in the United States: Relative Wealth Vs. Relative Wage Effects", Journal of International Economics (1994). citation courtesy of

October 1993Small Business and Job Creation: Dissecting the Myth and Reassessing theFacts
with Steven J. Davis, John Haltiwanger: w4492
This paper investigates how job creation and destruction behavior varies by employer size in the U.S. manufacturing sector during the period 1972 to 1988. The paper also evaluates the empirical basis for conventional claims about the job-creating prowess of small businesses. The chief findings and conclusions fall into five categories: (1) Conventional wisdom about the job-creating prowess of small businesses rests on misleading interpretations of the data. (2) Many previous studies of the job creation process rely upon data that are not suitable for drawing inferences about the relationship between employer size and job creation. (3) Large plants and firms account for most newly-created and newly- destroyed manufacturing jobs. (4) Survival rates for new and existing...

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