NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Paolo Colla

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers only

Working Papers and Chapters

August 2012Which Financial Frictions? Parsing the Evidence from the Financial Crisis of 2007-9
with Tobias Adrian, Hyun Song Shin: w18335
The financial crisis of 2007-9 has sparked keen interest in models of financial frictions and their impact on macro activity. Most models share the feature that borrowers suffer a contraction in the quantity of credit. However, the evidence suggests that although bank lending to firms declines during the crisis, bond financing actually increases to make up much of the gap. This paper reviews both aggregate and micro level data and highlights the shift in the composition of credit between loans and bonds. Motivated by the evidence, we formulate a model of direct and intermediated credit that captures the key stylized facts. In our model, the impact on real activity comes from the spike in risk premiums, rather than contraction in the total quantity of credit.

Published: Which Financial Frictions? Parsing the Evidence from the Financial Crisis of 2007 to 2009, Tobias Adrian, Paolo Colla, Hyun Song Shin. in NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2012, Volume 27, Acemoglu, Parker, and Woodford. 2013

June 2012Which Financial Frictions? Parsing the Evidence from the Financial Crisis of 2007 to 2009
with Tobias Adrian, Hyun Song Shin
in NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2012, Volume 27, Daron Acemoglu, Jonathan Parker, and Michael Woodford, editors
The financial crisis of 2007-9 has sparked keen interest in models of financial frictions and their impact on macro activity. Most models share the feature that borrowers suffer a contraction in the quantity of credit. However, the evidence suggests that although bank lending to firms declines during the crisis, bond financing actually increases to make up much of the gap. This paper reviews both aggregate and micro level data and highlights the shift in the composition of credit between loans and bonds. Motivated by the evidence, we formulate a model of direct and intermediated credit that captures the key stylized facts. In our model, the impact on real activity comes from the spike in risk premiums, rather than contraction in the total quantity of credit.

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers only

 
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