NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Marcus Rebick

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Working Papers and Chapters

February 2003Constraints on the Level and Efficient Use of Labor in Japan
with Hiroshi Ono: w9484
We examine a number of personnel practices, laws and regulations that lower the supply of labor in the Japanese economy. Broadly speaking, there are two kinds of impediments, those that restrict the movement of labor between firms, and those that discourage women from participating to a greater extent. Using other OECD countries and especially the United States as a benchmark, we estimate that removal of these barriers would increase the productive labor supply in Japan by some 13 to 18 percent and thus could raise the potential growth rate of the Japanese economy by roughly 1% per annum over a ten-year period.
January 2003Constraints on the Level and Efficient Use of Labor
with Hiroshi Ono
in Structural Impediments to Growth in Japan, Magnus Blomström, Jennifer Corbett, Fumio Hayashi and Anil Kashyap, editors
January 1994Social Security and Older Workers' Labor Market Responsiveness: The United States, Japan, and Sweden
in Social Protection versus Economic Flexibility: Is There a Trade-Off?, Rebecca M. Blank
May 1989Crumbling Pillar? Declining Union Density in Japan
with Richard B. Freeman: w2963
This paper seeks to understand the recent decline of union density in Japan from 35% in 1975 to 28% in 1987. The decline in density is analyzed in terms of the changing proportion of workers in high and low unionization groups and the changes in density within those groups. Then using a stockflow relationship we look at how the organizing rate of new unions affects the overall density. A regression model assesses our interpretation of changes in Japanese density. Our principal findings are: (1) Structural shifts in the composition of employment and of the demographics of the work force account for only a modest proportion of the drop in Japanese density. As in the United States, most changes in density occur within industries and among defined demographic groups of workers. (2) Much of the...

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