NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Magnus Lofstrom

Contact and additional information for this authorAll publicationsWorking Papers only

Working Papers and Chapters

February 2008Is the GED an Effective Route to Postsecondary Education for School Dropouts?
with John H. Tyler: w13816
We use data from the Texas Schools Microdata Panel (TSMP) to examine the extent to which dropouts use the GED as a route to post-secondary education. The paper develops a model pointing out the potential biases in estimating the effects of taking the "GED path" to postsecondary education. Lacking suitable instruments that would allow us to directly address potential biases, our approach is to base our estimates on a set of academically "at risk" students who are very similar in the 8th grade. We observe that the eventual high school graduates in this group have much better postsecondary education outcomes than do the similar at-risk 8th graders who dropped out and obtained a GED. Our model explains the observed differences, and allows for a discussion of the policy challenges inherent in i...
January 2000The Educational Attainment of Immigrants: Trends and Implications
with Julian R. Betts
in Issues in the Economics of Immigration, George J. Borjas, editor
October 1998The Educational Attainment of Immigrants: Trends and Implications
with Julian R. Betts: w6757
This paper uses the 1970, 1980, and 1990 U.S. Censuses to study trends in educational attainment of immigrants relative to natives. Immigrants have become relatively less highly educated, but have become more highly educated in an absolute sense. The effects of changes in relative educational attainment between immigrants and natives on earnings are studied. Educational differences are found to explain more than half the observed wage gap between the two groups. The paper also allows for non-linearities in returns to education. Sheepskin effects influence earnings in different ways for natives and immigrants. Differences in returns to pre- and post-migration education also appear. The paper also finds evidence that immigrants crowd natives out of education, although the effects are st...

Contact and additional information for this authorAll publicationsWorking Papers only

 
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