NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Lisa Powell

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers only

Working Papers and Chapters

April 2011Economic Contextual Factors and Child Body Mass Index
with Frank J. Chaloupka
in Economic Aspects of Obesity, Michael Grossman and Naci H. Mocan, editors
June 2009Economic Contextual Factors and Child Body Mass Index
with Frank J. Chaloupka: w15046
This study examines the relationship between child weight and fast food and fruit and vegetable prices and the availability of fast food restaurants, full-service restaurants, supermarkets, grocery stores and convenience stores. We estimate cross-sectional and individual-level fixed effects (FE) models to account for unobserved individual-level heterogeneity. Data are drawn from the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics combined with external food price and outlet density data at the zip code level. FE results show that higher fruit and vegetable prices are statistically significantly related to a higher body mass index (BMI) percentile ranking among children with greater effects among low-income children: fruit and vegetable price elasticity for BMI is estima...

Published: Economic Contextual Factors and Child Body Mass Index, Lisa M. Powell, Frank J. Chaloupka. in Economic Aspects of Obesity, Grossman and Mocan. 2011

Direct and Indirect Effects of Teenage Body Weight on Adult Wages
with Euna Han, Edward C. Norton: w15027
Previous estimates on the association between body weight and wages in the literature have been contingent on education and occupation. This paper examines the direct effect of BMI on wages and the indirect effects operating through education and occupation choice, particularly for late-teen BMI and adult wages. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 data, we show that education is the main pathway for the indirect BMI wage penalty. The total BMI wage penalty is underestimated by 18% for women without including those indirect effects. Whereas for men there is no statistically significant direct BMI wage penalty, we do observe a small indirect wage penalty through education.

Published: Econ Hum Biol. 2011 Dec;9(4):381-92. doi: 10.1016/j.ehb.2011.07.002. Epub 2011 Jul 19. Direct and indirect effects of body weight on adult wages. Han E, Norton EC, Powell LM.

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers only

 
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