NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Ina Ganguli

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers only

Working Papers and Chapters

May 2015It's Good to be First: Order Bias in Reading and Citing NBER Working Papers
with Daniel R. Feenberg, Patrick Gaule, Jonathan Gruber: w21141
Choices are frequently made from lists where there is by necessity some ordering of options. In such situations individuals can exhibit both primacy bias towards the first option and recency bias towards the last option. We examine this phenomenon in a particularly interesting context: consumer response to the ordering of economics papers in an email announcement issued by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Each Monday morning Eastern Standard Time (EST) the NBER issues a “New This Week” (NTW) email that lists all of the working papers that have been issued in the past week. This email goes to more than 23,000 subscribers, both inside and outside academia, and the placement order is based on random factors. We show that despite the randomized list placement, papers that ...
August 2014Why and Wherefore of Increased Scientific Collaboration
with Richard B. Freeman, Raviv Murciano-Goroff
in The Changing Frontier: Rethinking Science and Innovation Policy, Adam Jaffe and Benjamin Jones, editors
We examine international and domestic collaborations using an original survey of corresponding authors and Web of Science data of articles that had at least one US coauthor in Particle and Field Physics, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and Biotechnology and Applied Microbiology. The data identify the connections among coauthors and the views of corresponding authors about the collaboration. We find that collaborations have increased across US cities and between US researchers and researchers abroad. However, they show sufficient similarity to indicate that collaborations are best viewed in many regards as occurring across space broadly rather than in terms of international vs. domestic collaborative activity. We also document that the main reason scientists give for collaborations is to ...
January 2014Why and Wherefore of Increased Scientific Collaboration
with Richard B. Freeman, Raviv Murciano-Goroff: w19819
This paper examines international and domestic collaborations using data from an original survey of corresponding authors and Web of Science data of articles that had at least one US coauthor in the fields of Particle and Field Physics, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and Biotechnology and Applied Microbiology. The data allow us to investigate the connections among coauthors and the views of corresponding authors about the collaboration. We have four main findings. First, we find that US collaborations have increased across US cities as well as across international borders, with the nature of collaborations across cities resembling that across countries. Second, face-to-face meetings are important in collaborations: most collaborators first met working in the same institution and communi...

Published: Why and Wherefore of Increased Scientific Collaboration, Richard B. Freeman, Ina Ganguli, Raviv Murciano-Goroff. in The Changing Frontier: Rethinking Science and Innovation Policy, Jaffe and Jones. 2015

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers only

 
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