NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Haiyan Deng

Contact and additional information for this authorAll publicationsWorking Papers only

Working Papers and Chapters

March 2010China's Local Comparative Advantage
with James Harrigan
in China's Growing Role in World Trade, Robert C. Feenstra and Shang-Jin Wei, editors
January 2005World Trade Flows: 1962-2000
with Robert C. Feenstra, Robert E. Lipsey, Alyson C. Ma, Hengyong Mo: w11040
We document a set of bilateral trade data by commodity for 1962-2000, which is available from www.nber.org/data (International Trade Data, NBER-UN world trade data). Users must agree not to resell or distribute the data for 1984-2000. The data are organized by the 4-digit Standard International Trade Classification, revision 2, with country codes similar to the United Nations classification. This dataset updates the Statistics Canada World Trade Database as described in Feenstra, Lipsey, and Bowen (1997), which was available for years 1970-1992. In that database, Statistics Canada had revised the United Nations trade data, mostly derived from the export side, to fit the Canadian trade classification and in some cases to add data not available from the export reports. In contrast, in the ne...
November 2004Estimating Real Production and Expenditures Across Nations: A Proposal for Improving the Penn World Tables
with Robert C. Feenstra, Alan Heston, Marcel P. Timmer: w10866
In this paper we propose a new approach to international comparisons of real GDP measured from the output-side. The traditional Geary-Khamis system to measure real GDP from the expenditure-side is modified to include differences in the terms of trade between countries. It is shown that this system has a strictly positive solution under mild assumptions. On the basis of a set of domestic final output, import and export prices and values for 14 European countries and the U.S. it is shown that differences between real GDP measured from the expenditure and output-side can be substantial, especially for small open economies.

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