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NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH

NBER Publications by Abe Dunn

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers onlyInformation about this author at RePEc

Working Papers and Chapters and Reporter Articles

February 2017Decomposing Medical-Care Expenditure Growth
with Eli B. Liebman, Adam Shapiro: w23117
Medical-care expenditures have been rising rapidly, accounting for over 17 percent of GDP in 2012. In this study, we assess the sources of the rising medical-care expenditures in the commercial sector. We employ a novel framework for decomposing expenditure growth into four components at the disease level: service price growth, service utilization growth, treated disease prevalence growth, and demographic shift. The decomposition shows that growth in prices and treated prevalence are the primary drivers of medical-care expenditure growth over the 2003 to 2007 period. There was no growth in service utilization at the aggregate level over this period. Price and utilization growth were especially large for the treatment of malignant neoplasms. For many conditions, treated prevalence has shift...

Forthcoming: Decomposing Medical-Care Expenditure Growth, Abe Dunn, Eli Liebman, Adam Hale Shapiro. in Measuring and Modeling Health Care Costs, Aizcorbe, Baker, Berndt, and Cutler. 2016

October 2016Decomposing Medical-Care Expenditure Growth
with Eli Liebman, Adam Hale Shapiro
in Measuring and Modeling Health Care Costs, Ana Aizcorbe, Colin Baker, Ernst Berndt, and David Cutler, editors
September 2014Developing a Framework for Decomposing Medical-Care Expenditure Growth: Exploring Issues of Representativeness
with Eli Liebman, Adam Hale Shapiro
in Measuring Economic Sustainability and Progress, Dale W. Jorgenson, J. Steven Landefeld, and Paul Schreyer, editors
Medical care expenditures have been rising rapidly over time and in 2009 health care accounted for 17.9 percent of GDP, but there are many areas where we have an incomplete understanding of spending growth in this sector. This is especially true of the commercial sector, where our primary data sources are often non-random convenience samples (i.e., available claims data from contributing insurers and employers). The goal of this paper is to better understand issues related to using convenience samples to obtain nationally representative estimates of the various components of expenditure growth. Using a multitude of weighting strategies, including weighted and unweighted estimates, we find similar qualitative results with higher prevalence and increases in medical care service prices being ...

Contact and additional information for this authorAll NBER papers and publicationsNBER Working Papers onlyInformation about this author at RePEc

 
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