NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Emiko Usui

Institute of Economic Research
Hitotsubashi University
2-1 Naka, Kunitachi
Tokyo 186-8603 Japan
Tel: 81-42-580-8348
Fax: 81-42-580-8348

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org
Institutional Affiliation: Hitotsubashi University

NBER Working Papers and Publications

May 2018Labor Force Participation of the Elderly in Japan
with Takashi Oshio, Satoshi Shimizutani: w24614
Japan experienced increases in labor force participation (LFP) of the elderly in recent years, as have other advanced countries. In the present study, we overview the employment trend of the elderly in Japan, and examine what factors have contributed to its increase since the early 2000s. Improved health and longevity, increasing education levels, and a shift towards less physically demanding jobs have allowed the elderly to stay longer in the labor force. However, elderly employment rebound and its timing are more closely linked to changes in social security incentives, especially increases in the eligibility age for public pension benefits. More broadly, reduced generosity in social security programs since the mid-1980s has been a key driver of the long-term trend change in elderly emplo...
February 2018Labor Force Participation of the Elderly in Japan
with Takashi Oshio, Satoshi Shimizutani
in Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Working Longer, Courtney Coile, Kevin Milligan, and David Wise, editors
Japan experienced increases in labor force participation (LFP) of the elderly in recent years, as have other advanced countries. In the present study, we overview the employment trend of the elderly in Japan, and examine what factors have contributed to its increase since the early 2000s. Improved health and longevity, increasing education levels, and a shift towards less physically demanding jobs have allowed the elderly to stay longer in the labor force. However, elderly employment rebound and its timing are more closely linked to changes in social security incentives, especially increases in the eligibility age for public pension benefits. More broadly, reduced generosity in social security programs since the mid-1980s has been a key driver of the long-term trend change in elderly emplo...
May 2017Health Capacity to Work at Older Ages: Evidence from Japan
with Satoshi Shimizutani, Takashi Oshio
in Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: The Capacity to Work at Older Ages, David A. Wise, editor
This paper explores the extent to which older Japanese can potentially expand the labor supply, based on two analytic approaches: the Milligan-Wise and Cutler et al. methods. First, we examine how much older individuals could work if they worked as much as those with the same mortality rate in the past (the Milligan-Wise method). Second, we estimate how much older individuals could work if they worked as much as younger ones in similar health (the Cutler et al. method). Results from both of these methods underscore a large work capacity in old age in Japan. We further investigate differences in health capacity across education groups and find that highly educated individuals tend to have more capacity to work after they are 65 years of age.
February 2016Health Capacity to Work at Older Ages: Evidence from Japan
with Satoshi Shimizutani, Takashi Oshio: w21971
This paper explores the extent to which older Japanese can potentially expand the labor supply, based on two analytic approaches: the Milligan-Wise and Cutler et al. methods. First, we examine how much older individuals could work if they worked as much as those with the same mortality rate in the past (the Milligan-Wise method). Second, we estimate how much older individuals could work if they worked as much as younger ones in similar health (the Cutler et al. method). Results from both of these methods underscore a large work capacity in old age in Japan. We further investigate differences in health capacity across education groups and find that highly educated individuals tend to have more capacity to work after they are 65 years of age.
 
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