JOSEPH P. FERRIE

Birth Date: 11 January 1961
Marital Status: Married, No Children

Office Address:
Department of Economics
Northwestern University
Evanston, Illinois 60208-2600

Phone: (847) 491-8210
Fax: (847) 491-7001
E-mail: ferrie@nwu.edu

Professional Interest:

Economic History, Historical Development of American Labor Markets, Historical Political Economy

Education:

Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts. B.A. (magna cum laude) in Economics
(Highest Honors) and History, May 1983.

London School of Economics and Political Science, London, England. General Course
Student Reading Economics and Economic History, 1981-82.

University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. M.A. in Economics, May 1987. Ph.D. in
Economics, May 1992.
Dissertation "'We Are Yankeys Now': The Economic Mobility of Antebellum
European Immigrants to the U.S."

Pre-Doctoral Awards, Honors, and Fellowships:

Phi Beta Kappa, Williams College, 1982.
David A. Wells Prize in Political Economy, Williams College, 1983.
Benedict Prize in History, Williams College, 1983.
Century Fellowship, University of Chicago, 1985-1988.
Searle Foundation Fellowship, University of Chicago, 1985-1988.
National Graduate (Javits) Fellowship, University of Chicago, 1985-88.
Rovensky Fellowship in Business and Economic History, University of Chicago, 1988-89.
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Demographic Training
Fellowship, Population Research Center of the University of Chicago, 1988-1991.

Allen Nevins Prize for Best Dissertation in U.S. Economic History, Economic History
Association Meetings, 1992.

John M. Olin Foundation Faculty Research Fellowship, 1993-94.
Arthur H. Cole Prize for Best Article Published in the Journal of Economic History in
1993, Economic History Association Meetings, 1994.

Employment:

Research Assistant, Williams College Department of Economics, 1982-85.
Research Assistant, Brookings Institution, 1983-84.
Teaching and Research Assistant, University of Chicago, 1986-1991.
Assistant Professor of Economics, Northwestern University, 1991-1997.
Associate Professor of Economics, Northwestern University, 1997-present.
Household International, Inc. Research Professor of Economics, Northwestern University,
1999-present.

Faculty Research Fellow, National Bureau of Economic Research, 1992-1997.
Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research, 1997-present.
Faculty Fellow, Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research, Northwestern University,
1995-1997.

Research Support:

John M. Olin Foundation Faculty Research Fellowship, 1993-94 (salary support for
academic year, and $7,000 summer research stipend).

National Science Foundation Grant No. SES 9309689: "Economic Mobility in Nineteenth
Century America," 1993-1995 (summer salary support, research assistants, travel,
and equipment: $92,000); Principal Investigator.

National Science Foundation, "Research Experience for Undergraduates," 1994-95
(additional research assistants for Grant No. SES 9309689: $10,000); Principal
Investigator.

National Science Foundation Grant No. SBR 9511344: "Immigrant and Native Mobility in
Historical Perspective: Comparative Economic Progress in the U.S., 1850-1990,"
1995-1998 (summer salary support, research assistants, travel, and equipment:
$148,000); Principal Investigator.

National Science Foundation Grant: "Longitudinal Data for the Study of Long Run Changes
in Economic Mobility in the U.S., 1850-1990," 1998-2000 (summer salary support,
research assistants, travel, and equipment: $119,000); Principal Investigator.

Publications and Work Accepted for Publication:

A. BOOKS

  1. 'Yankeys Now': European Immigrants in the Antebellum U.S., 1840-60 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999).

  2. Southern Paternalism and the Rise of the Welfare State: Economics, Politics, and Institutions in the U.S. South, 1865-1965 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999). With Lee J. Alston.

B. ARTICLES IN SCHOLARLY JOURNALS

  1. "Labor Costs, Paternalism, and Loyalty in Southern Agriculture: A Constraint on the Growth of the Welfare State." Journal of Economic History 45 (March 1985): 95-118. With Lee J. Alston.

  2. "Resisting the Welfare State: Southern Opposition to the Farm Security Administra-tion." In Robert Higgs (ed.), Research in Economic History Supplement 4: Emergence of the Modern Political Economy (1985): 83-120. With Lee J. Alston.

  3. "Social Control and Labor Relations in the American South Before the Mechanization of the Cotton Harvest in the 1950s." Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 145 (March 1989): 133-157. With Lee J. Alston.

  4. "'We Are Yankeys Now': The Economic Mobility of Antebellum European Immigrants to the U.S." (Dissertation summary) Journal of Economic History 53 (June 1993): 388-391.

  5. "Paternalism in Agricultural Labor Contracts in the U.S. South: Implications for the Growth of the Welfare State." American Economic Review 83 (September 1993): 852-876. With Lee J. Alston. Reprinted in Lee J. Alston, Thrainn Eggertsson, and Douglass C. North (eds.), Empirical Studies in Institutional Change (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996).

  6. "The Wealth Accumulation of Antebellum European Immigrants to the U.S., 1840-60." Journal of Economic History 54 (March 1994): 1-33.

  7. "The Geographic Mobility of Antebellum European Immigrants to the U.S. After Their Arrival At New York, 1840-60." Research in Economic History 15 (1995): 99-148.

  8. "Up and Out or Down and Out? The Occupational Mobility of Immigrant Non-Persisters in the Nineteenth Century U.S." Journal of Interdisciplinary History 26 (Summer 1995): 33-55.

  9. "A New Sample of Americans Linked from the 1850 Public Use Micro Sample of the Federal Census of Population to the 1860 Federal Census Manuscript Schedules." National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper on Historical Factors in Long Run Growth No. 71 (March 1996) and Historical Methods 29 (Fall 1996): 141-156.

  10. "The Entry Into the U.S. Labor Market of Antebellum European Immigrants, 1840-60." National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper on Historical Factors in Long Run Growth No. 88 (July 1996) and Explorations in Economic History 34 (July 1997): 295-330.

  11. "Immigrants and Natives in the U.S.: Comparative Economic Performance in the United States, 1850-1860 and 1965-1980." National Bureau of Economic Research Historical Paper No. 93 (September 1996) and Research in Labor Economics 16 (1997): 319-341.

C. CHAPTERS IN EDITED BOOKS

  1. "The Bracero Program and U.S. Farm Labor Legislation in World War II." In Hugh Rockoff and Geoffrey T. Mills (eds.), The Sinews of War: Essays on the Economic History of World War II (Ames: Iowa State University Press, 1993). With Lee J. Alston.

  2. "Emigration and Entrepreneurship in the Nineteenth Century U.S." In Herbert Giersch (ed.), Economic Aspects of International Migration (Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1994). With Joel Mokyr.

D. WORKING PAPERS

  1. "A Model of In-Kind Compensation in Agriculture." University of California (Davis), Agricultural History Center, Working Paper No. 34 (April 1986). With Lee J. Alston.

  2. "Strikes and the Law in the U.S., 1880-1894: New Evidence on the Origins of American Exceptionalism." National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. 5368 (November 1995). With Janet M. Currie. Under review, Journal of Economic History, August 1997.

  3. "The Impact of Immigration on Natives in the Antebellum U.S., 1850-60." Northwestern University Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research, Working Paper No. WP-96-14 (March 1996).

E. BOOK REVIEWS

  1. "Review of Lee Soltow, Distribution of Wealth and Income in the United States in 1798." Business History Review 65 (Autumn 1991): 668-669.

  2. "Review of Mark Wyman, Round-Trip to America: The Immigrants Return to Europe, 1880-1930. " Journal of Economic History 54 (September 1994): 720-722.

Professional Talks:

Williams College Department of Economics Faculty Seminar, 1983.
Middlebury College Conference on Economic Issues, 1983.
Conference on Quantitative Methods in Economic History (Cliometrics), 1983.
Ninth Quadrennial World Economic History Congress, Berne, Switzerland, 1985.
University of Chicago Economic History Workshop, 1986.
World Congress of the Cliometric Society, Santander, Spain, 1989.
Economic History Association Meetings, Montreal, 1990.
Social Science History Association Meetings, Minneapolis, 1990.
Yale University Department of Economics Faculty Seminar, 1991.
University of Iowa Department of Economics Faculty Seminar, 1991.
University of Illinois Economic History Workshop, 1991.
Brigham Young University Department of Economics Faculty Seminar, 1991.
Economic History Association Meetings, Boulder, 1991.
University of Chicago Economic History Workshop, 1991.
Social Science History Association Meetings, New Orleans, 1991.
American Economic Association Meetings, New Orleans, 1992.
Egon-Sohman Foundation Conference on Economic Aspects of International Migration,
Vancouver, 1992.

Economic History Association Meetings, Boston, 1992.
Social Science History Association Meetings, Chicago, 1992.
Harvard University Economic History Workshop, 1992.
University of Chicago Economic History Workshop, 1993.
National Bureau of Economic Research, Development of the American Economy Program,
1992.

Brigham Young University Department of Economics Faculty Seminar, 1993.
Queens University Economic History Seminar, 1993.
McGill University Economic History Seminar, 1993.
Conference on Historical Uses of Census Materials, University of Guelph, 1993.
National Bureau of Economic Research, Franco-American Conference on Economic
History, 1993.

Indiana University Economic History Workshop, 1993.
Social Science History Association Meetings, Baltimore, 1993.
University of Arizona, 1994.
Yale University, 1994.
National Bureau of Economic Research, Development of the American Economy Program,
Spring Meeting, 1994.

National Bureau of Economic Research, Development of the American Economy Program,
summer Institute, 1994.

Economic History Association Meetings, Cincinnati, 1994.
American Economic Association Meetings, Washington, D.C., 1995.
Vanderbilt University Department of Economics, 1995.
All-University of California Economic History Conference, Riverside, 1995.
University of California, Los Angeles, 1995.
University of Southern California, 1995.
University of Illinois, Chicago, 1995.
University of Illinois, Urbana, 1995.
National Bureau of Economic Research, Development of the American Economy Program,
Summer Institute, 1995.

Econometric Society Seventh World Congress, Tokyo, 1995.
Social Science History Association Meetings, Chicago, 1995.
National Bureau of Economic Research, Development of the American Economy Program,
Spring Meeting, 1996.

Northwestern University Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research Faculty Colloquium,
1996.

Washington (DC) Economic History Group, 1996.
National Bureau of Economic Research, Development of the American Economy Program,
Summer Institute, 1997.

World Congress of Climetrics, Munich, Germany, 1997.
"The Scattering: Perspectives on Irish Emigration," University of Cork, Ireland, 1997.
"Famine Migration,"> University of Heidelburg, Germany, 1997.
American Economic Association Meetings, Chicago, 1997.

Leaves of Absence:

John M. Olin Foundation Faculty Research Fellowship, June 1993-June 1994 (salary
support for academic year, and $7,000 summer research stipend). Independent
research undertaken at Northwestern University on "Economic Mobility in the
Nineteenth Century U.S." for a manuscript on this topic.

Peer-Review and Related Activities:

REFEREE AND REVIEWER FOR:
American Economic Review
Journal of Economic History
Explorations in Economic History
Business History Review
International Migration Review
Journal of Economic and Business Statistics

National Science Foundation

Professional Affiliations and Services:

MEMBERSHIPS:

American Economic Association
Economic History Association
Social Science History Association
Cliometric Society
Economic History Society (U.K.)

CONFERENCES AND SEMINARS ORGANIZED:

Northwestern University Department of Economics Economic History Workshop, 1991-
1995.

Social Science History Association Meetings, Session on Historical and Economic Aspects
of Immigration to the U.S., Chicago, 1992.

Cliometric Society Meetings, Co-Organizer, Evanston, 1993.
Mid-West Economic Association, Session on Historical Labor Markets, Chicago, 1994.
Economic History Association Meetings, Local Arrangements Committee, Chicago, 1995.
National Bureau of Economic Research, Program in the Development of the American
Economy, Summer Institute, Co-Organizer, 1995-1996.

Work Now in Progress:

"Southern Agriculture in the Twentieth Century." In Stanley Engerman and Robert Gallman

(eds.), The Cambridge Economic History of the U.S. (New York: Cambridge
University Press, forthcoming, 1997). A survey of research in economic history on the
agricultural sector in the U.S. South since World War I, with a critical bibliography.
"Mortality and the Standard of Living in the U.S., 1850-1870." An examination of the socio-
economic correlates (wealth, occupation, location) of specific causes of death in the
middle of the 19th century, using a new sample of several thousand Americans linked
from the mortality schedules to the population schedules of the decennial federal
census. With Clayne L. Pope.
"The Agricultural Ladder in the South: Panel Data for Jefferson County, Arkansas, 1890-
1940." A new look at "the agricultural ladder" (the progression from wage worker to
sharecropper to tenant to owner) through a description and analysis of the complete
career histories of more than 300 farmers. With Lee J. Alston.
"Westward Who? Migration to the Frontier in 19th Century America." A re-examination of
"the Turner Thesis" (the view of the frontier as a "safety valve" for excess labor in the
19th century) using unique data on both males who moved to the west between 1850
and 1870 and males who did not migrate over the same decades, from new samples
of males linked between the 1850 and 1860 federal censuses and between the 1860
and 1870 federal censuses.
"The Impact of Antebellum Immigration on the U.S. Labor Market: New Evidence on the
Displacement of Native-Born Workers." An assessment of the impact of the massive
immigration of the 1850s (which saw the highest ratios of arriving immigrants to
resident population in U.S. history) on the labor market conditions faced by native-
born workers, using data on males who have been located in both the 1850 and 1860
federal census manuscripts.
"Gender Differences in Union Organizing Activity and Strike Outcomes in the U.S., 1880-
1894." An analysis of the treatment of female workers by organized labor and the
success of female workers in winning labor disputes, using dispute-level data on more
than 12,000 strikes and lockouts during one of the most contentious periods in U.S.
labor history. With Janet M. Currie.

Teaching and Advising:

AREAS OF UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE TEACHING:
Population Economics (undergraduate).
Economic History (undergraduate and graduate).
Microeconomics (undergraduate)

COURSES TAUGHT:

Economics B02 "Introduction to Microeconomics," Spring 1996-1997.
Undergraduate course, lecture.

Economics C15 "Classical Problems in Economic History: Three Centuries of
Economic Mobility," Spring 1992. Undergraduate course, lecture.

Economics C17 "Population and Economic Growth," Spring 1992, Spring 1993, and
Spring 1995. Undergraduate course, lecture.

Economics C23 "Economic History of the U.S.," Fall 1993, Fall 1994. Undergraduate
course, lecture.

Economics C23-1 "Economic History of the U.S. to 1865," Spring 1998, Winter
1999. Undergraduate course, lecture.

Economics C34 "Business and Government," Spring 1995-1998. Undergraduate
course, lecture.

Economics D20-1 "U.S. Economic History," Spring 1993, Spring 1995, Winter 1996,
Spring 1997, Spring 1998, Winter 1999. Graduate course, seminar.

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT:

Economics C15 "Classical Problems in Economic History: Three Centuries of
Economic Mobility," Spring 1992. New course.

Economics C17 "Population and Economic Growth," Spring 1992. Completely new
version of an existing course.

Economics C23 "Economic History of the U.S.," Fall 1993. Completely new version
of an existing course.

Economics C23-1 "Economic History of the U.S. to 1865," Spring 1998. Completely
new version of an existing course.

Economics C34 "Business and Government," Spring 1995. Completely new version of
an existing course.

Economics D20-1 "U.S. Economic History," Spring 1993. Completely new version of
an existing course.

DISSERTATION COMMITTEE MEMBER AND READER FOR:

Paul Huck, 1992.
Charles Miles, 1993.
Simone Wegge, 1996.
Carolyn Moehling, 1996.
Kevin Hasker, 1998.

OTHER ACTIVITIES:

Economics Department Undergraduate Advisor, 1992-present.
College of Arts and Sciences Freshman Advisor, 1992-1994, 1996-present.
Economics Department Undergraduate Studies Committee, 1994-1997.
Economics Department Undergraduate Honors Committee, 1994-1997.
Economics Department Director of Computing, 1997-present.
Board of Editors, Journal of Economic History, 1998-present.
Social Science History Association, Nominating Committee, Chair, 1998.
Associate Editor, Historical Statistics of the United States, Millennial Edition.
Economics Department, Director of Graduate Studies, 1998-present.

COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY SERVICE:

CAS Convocation Marshal, 1993.
Faculty Commencement Marshal, 1993 and 1998.
University Committee on Information Technology, 1997-present.